My Crazy Lenses / Meine sehr speziellen Objektive – No.1: Focal-Length 40 mm / Die Brennweite 40 mm

40 mm/45 mm (or 43 mm) is one of my very favorite focal lengths: in fact it corresponds very close to the diagonal of the 35 mm still photo format!

… and it is the perfect focal length for street photography – and for all situations in which you have just one focal legth to choose, which means: you have no choice really …

The first camera, whith which I was „socialized“ for Single Lens Reflex Cameras was the Contaflex II with Tessar 45mm f2.8 of 1953.

Contaflex-II_900

It was the time before the German photo industry „suddenly“ collapsed and when the local camera dealer still could repair a Contaflex II mechanically just within a day! (And there was nothing else really but mechanics – you will not seriously call a Selen photosensitive cell „electronics“?!)

This history may have strongly influenced me in my preference for this focal length – but you may also find one thousand good reasons for this focal length, which is the „real normal focal length = the diagonal of the 24 x 36-format“ indeed: longer than 35mm, shorter than 50mm.

In early times most of the point-and-shoot-cameras with fixed (built-in) normal lenses had 38mm to 45mm lenses … and there are still some today.

In fact this focal length was ALWAYS present in the photo industry for system cameras – and I own some of them:

Tessar 45mm f2.8 as fixed lens in the Contaflex II of 1953
„New“ Tessar 45mm f2.8 for Contax/Yashica-Mount – a 1983 design based on new glass
MD-Rokkor 45mm f2.0 – a pancace-type standard lens for Minolta SRT cameras of 1978
Minolta M-Rokkor 40mm f2.0 with Leica-M bayonet  (for the 1973 „CL“ Leica/Minolta)
Olympus 40mm f2.0 – an ultra compact pancake design of 1978 for OM cameras
Planar 45mm f2.0 for Contax G1/G2 of 1994

… and the modern available to-date lenses:
Fujinon 27mm f2.8 pancake design for APS-format X-trans sensors (correspond. to 43mm)
Panasonic 20mm f1.7 for Micro Fourthirds (corresponds to 40mm at FullFormat)
Batis (Distagon) 40mm f2.0 for Sony E-Mount (FullFormat) of 2018
Sigma 40mm f1.4 for Sony-E-Mount (FullFormat) of 2018
Fujinon 50mm f3.5 for Fujifilm GFX50/100 with sensor 44mm x 33mm

From this list of 11 lenses you can make the conclusion how important this focal length is to me!

… and there is an interval of 65 years in making betweeen all of these lenses!

There are other famous historical lenses, which are not available to me:

I once owned a Nikkor 45mm f2.8 pancake-lens of 1977 on the Nikon F3M – it was a just average Tessar design. The Pentax DA 45mm f2.8 Limited is famous (a Gaussian!). As far as I know, Canon never played around with something like that … nor did Leica! What a pitty!
There is as far as I know also a modern Voigtländer lens 40mm f2.0, which I never tried! As it is an „Ultron“-design (and also includes an aspherical lens) it should also be of top notch performance. About the Voigtländer Nokton 40mm f1.2 aspherical I know nothing but that it probably is a „Distagon“-type lens as my Batis is …

Now here is my odd couple of the week:

–> look at the Olympus 40mm f2.0 pancake vs the Sigma 40mm f1.4 !

OddCouple_OM+Sig_
Bild 1 / picture 1: Olympus OM 40mm f2.0 und Sigma 40mm f1.4 – David and Goliath?

The Olympus 40mm f2.0 is a modified (6 lens – 6 groups!) double Gauss design – but extremly sophisticated due to the extremely short physical length combined with a very respectable speed of 2.0 at a length of 26mm and weight of 146 grams – Filter diameter 49 mm … and the close-focusing ability to 0.3 meters in spite of its compactness! You must however consider, that the OM is made for an SLR: that means: to put it on the same mirrorless Sony-E-Mount-Camera, the adapter adds another 28 mm. But in spite of that – the optical construction is actually pressed into the 26 mm length – including space for a filter-thread… Sitting on my Olympus OM 3Ti camera body it is as perfect package!

The Sigma 40mm f1.4 DG HSM / Art for E-Mount is a monster weighing 1,200 grams and stretching over a length of 157mm. It is composed from 16 lenses, which are stacked nearly face-to-face in the volume of the assembly – including all types of modern glasses  … and even one aspherical lens! And it uses 82mm diameter filters … You could call this a „stretch-limousine“ of modern photo-technique … When you put it on a Sony A7R you feel crazy – and in the street everybody thinks, you are peeping into the crowd with a super-telephoto! That is somewhat embarrassing.

And no: it has NO tripod-thread somewhere near the lens+camera-center-of-gravity. So you have to balance the massive lens on one hand while you take care of that tiny miniaturized camera at the near end of it…

Could there be any rational sense in the making of the Sigma-Monster? Serving exactly the same purpose on the camera: taking a picture with an angle of view of circa 57 degrees?

O.k., lets try:

The lens has a very high speed – I do not know personally any other 40mm-lens with f1.4 so far  – at least for FullFormat. (There has been a 40mm f1.4 for Olympus Pen HalfFrame-Cameras in the nineteen-sixties and yes: there is even a Voigtländer Nokton 40mm f1.2 now for 35mm) … and this Sigma is the best photographic lens I know at present for 35mm-format (independent of focal length and brightness)  – a fact that might justify even the price … Beware: this is my personal ranking – nothing more nor less.

The optical qualitiy of the lens is overwhelming … I instantly saw the brilliant performance of this lens – just through the finder of my Sony camera! An extraordinary situation! At f1.4 !!!

So now let us look at the resolution facts measured with IMATEST. For this I use generally the Sony A7RM4. How much better is the super-ambitioned super-modern Sigma against the antique Olympus gem of 1978?

The spreadsheet shows some other historical and modern lenses for comparison purpose.

(Remark: As I cannot measure resolution with a fixed lens in an analog camera like the Contaflex II, I chose a typical 50mm-Tessar of the nineteen-fifty/sixties from Zeiss-Ikon for the first comparison-position. The „old“ Tessar from 1961 is what you expect from it (based on 1902 invention by Paul Rudolph): good anastigmatic design but a little bit soft.

OddCouple40-2

Bild2 / picture 2: Resolution, edge-profile width, distortion and  CA for a group of 40/45mm-lenses for 35mm-FullFormat (plus corresponding Fujinon 27mm-lens for APS-sensor format)

(Bemerkung zu der hier neu hinzugefügten Spalte 4 – „Kantenschärfe“: das ist die Breite des Übergangs an einer standardisierten Hell-Dunkel-Kante von 10% bis 90% (in Bildmitte) – siehe untenstehendes Bild 2

Remark in reference to the column 4 width of „edge-profile“: this is the width of the transition from white to black at a standardized edge between 10% and 90% of brightness (in the center) – see picture 2 below, upper graph:

Kante_Sigma40f1,4

Bild 3 / picture 3: Edge profile (10-90% rise) – upper picture) and MTF-curve (lower) for Sigma 40mm f1.4 fully open (f1.4). Absolute perfect performance! Remarkable MTF-result: MTF is stunning 0.403 at Nyquist-frequency and drops slowly stopping down! Excelent lenses like the Batis 40mm f2.0 start at 0.3 and reach 0.35 at optimum f-stop (f4.0).

The optical quality-results of the Sigma 40mm f1.4 / Art (on the 62 MP Sony A7R4 –  Nyquist frequency: 3.168 LP/PH):

  • At f1.4 the weightet mean resolution of MTF30 over full frame is 93% Nyquist-frequency (center 102%, corner 78%)
  • 10-90% rise of edge profile is 0.96 pixels at f1.4 – which is lowest at this f-stop
  • MTF at Nyquist-frequency is 0.403 at f1.4 – going down to 0.34 at f5.6.
  • Center resolution is max. at f2.0 with 110% Nyquist-frequency (3.472 LP/PH)
  • weighted mean is max. at f5.6 with 99% Nyquist-frequency
  • at this f5.6 f-stop the corner-resolution (average over 4 corners!) reaches 88%
  • The differences of resolution between f2.0 and f8.0 are irrelevant under practical photographical aspects: 3.017 – 3.141 LP/PH weighted average over the full frame!
  • Distortion is -0.01% to -0.1% – at most f-stops around 0.05% – let’s say: „ZERO“
  • Lateral Chromatic Aberration (CA) is max. 0.1 mostly ca. 0.03 pixels around f5,6
  • Autofocus is excellent!
  • Due to the high image-contrast, manual focusing is very easy, fast and precise with this lens!

(LP/PH means: Line pairs per picture hight – picture hight für Sony A7R4 is 6336 pixels.)

Conclusion: The Sigma 40mm f1.4 is a highly convincing lens opticaly and in build quality. A bit closer focusing range would have been nice for its price (like the Batis 40f2.0 – and even the pancake OM-40mmf2.0 focuses closer!) – the handling on the Sony mirrorless camera is a serious task … I cannot recommend to put the camera with this lens on a tripod for day-to-day-work – just using the tripod-thread of the camera-body! (For my IMATEST test-frames it worked just o.k.). I would recommend to use this lens on a massive and solid D-SLR to be really happy with it! Personally I would use it for Street Photography and for Architecture – if there were not the handling restrictions.

And what about the optical merits of the compact side of the „Odd Couple„? —- The Olympus OM 40mm f2.0?

The merits are fantastic – even in comparison to modern lenses – especially under the aspect of its compactness. I was very amazed, when I read, that the lens was considered by Olympus as a low-cost alternative to other standard lenses (entered at just below 80 Dollars!). In spite of that (and the quality!) there were not so many sold … (good for the price on the second hand market!).

This lens was designed just a few years before the exciting new glass-types (like ED-glass) entered the industry – delivered from 1978. In the center it is just about 3% behind the Batis – even open at f2.0. In the corners it starts low – typical for the time (see the MD 45mm f2.0). Stopped down to f8 it improves dramatically in the corners (at 90% of the FOV!) – resolving ca. 7% close to the corner performance of the Batis 40mm. This resolution-perfomance of the OM 40mm f2.0 is much better than it could be brougt practically to the normal analog film-emulsions of the 1970s times (or even today) – with good contrast at the same time.

The price, this Olympus OM-lens has to pay for its compactness is obviously the distortion (at -1.5% still really acceptable for the time) and the CA – twice as big than contemporary „standard-Lenses“ and 20 times larger than typical today (not to forget both properties could be corrected afterwards today as well!).

Stopped down this ultra-compact Olympus OM-gem  40mm f2.0 reaches results in practical picture-taking, which use the resolution of the 62 MP mirrorless sensor seriously! Look at the two comparison-shots of a Montbretia-colony below, which are taken free-hand, manual focussing. The depth of the scene allows to judge, where the sharpness-plane is. And with a large number of similar objects you have the chance, to hit one of these with the focus-point exactly. At least you can tell: no – it is not the lens, which is not sharp: it is you, who focused wrong …

I chose a „nature-scene“, because in this you have the chance, that below the larger structure of the object there is still a sub-structure … and below that another sub-structure … and so on! The picture of a bicycle-frame does not offer too much of that … I did focus at the stamens of the highest upright blossoms near the center. (Natural sunlight came from the right side.)

DSC06004_HD

Bild 4 /picture 4: The scene for the comparison shot – here with Olympus OM 40mm f2.0 at f8  – distance ca. 0.9 m (on Sony A7R4) – MANUAL focussing

Following are sections at 100%-view-level (no corrections made on the data-file):

Here with the Sigma-lens I exactly hit the target, which I focused (blossom in the middle of the three) – on a big screen you see the wonderfull plasticity of the stamens-details even on this level of enlargment. Red is a difficult colour and the contrast within the blossom-leaves is very low.

DSC06000_Sigma100%

Bild 5 /picture 5: Detail of this scene – here with Sigma 40mm f1.4 at f8 (H:1325 pixel)

Next is taken with the Olympus OM 40mm f2.0: the focus sits about one cm more in front compared to the Sigma-shot: here it is the right blossom with stamens – nearly as sharp as with the sigma. I had not noticed, that a wasp had settled on the Montbretia flower – exactly in the focal plane …!

DSC06001_OM100%

Bild 6 / picture 6: Detail of the scene with Olympus OM 40mm f2.0 at f8 (H: 1300 pixel)

Next picture:  Look how the insect pops out from the picture with the Olympus OM-lens at 0.9 meters focusing distance, with a surprising plasticity even at 100% viewing-enlargement (see picture 7) – even the fine hairs on the insects body starting to show.

DSC06004_OM40_Wespe_100%

Bild 7 /picture 7: Detail of a second shot with the wasp taken with Olympus OM 40mm f2.0 at f8 (height: 763 pixel) – at 100%-enlargement (picture taken at distance 0.9 meters!)

Conclusion: if you like to stay nearly „invisible“ in the street (where corner-resolution rarely matters!) and if you are well used to and experienced with manual focusing (MF), this more than 40 years old Olympus lens-design still is a valid option to use – even on the Sony A7R4! My copy still is clear and contrasty (obviously!). Near the center, the detail-resolution is really comparable to the Sigma monster-lens stopped down (f5.6 … 8.0). The merits of the Sigma-lens are its phantastic performance between f1.4 and f2.8 and into the corners – at practically zero distortion and CA!

The closest modern competitor to the Sigma 40mm is the Batis 40mm f2.0 (Distagon), which is just slightly behind the Sigma in every single optical property – fortunately it is also somewhat behind in price … and very-very-much lower in weight. As mentioned already it focuses very close! In practical picture-taking situations, you would probably not be able to tell which picture is made with the Sigma and which with the Zeiss-Batis – if close focusing is not part of the game…

The optical properties of all the other historical lenses in the comparison show very well the typical development in optical quality of standard-lenses over the time since just shortly after World War II (from 1953 – when I was 8 years old).

Two of these lenses ar made not for SLRs but for Rangefinder-Cameras, with the typical short distance between the rear of the lens and the film/sensor (rear focus). Especially at wider field of view this leads to light-rays, hitting at very flat angles onto the picture-plane. That is no problem with analog film – but a desaster with digital sensors!

These RF-lenses are the Minolta-M 40mm f2.0 (for Leica-M-Mount, coming with the Minolta CL in 1973) and the Planar 45mm f2.0 for the legendary (Autofocus!) Contax G1/G2 – early 1990s. Both are suffering severely under the oblique-ray-problem on the Sony-Sensor leading to very low corner-resolution in my measurements! This does not reflect the real performance on analog film!

The Planar 45mm f2.0 was famous as one of the best standard-lenses of its time – and I can confirm, that there is no such corner-resolution issues on analog film with my Contax G2. Interesting, that the issue vanishes stopped down to f8. Together with the Sonnar 90mm f2.8 on the Contax G2 you had one of the best lens-sets  of the 90s (plus autofucus!) on one of the most beautiful cameras EVER… That you could additionally have a crazy HOLOGON 16mm f8 on this camera makes it even more remarkable.

Sensational is the „New Zeiss Tessar“ 45mm f2.8 for Contax SLR – an extreme pancake-lens  (length 16mm !) based on the new glass-types of the early 1980s. In this Zeiss has extended the performance of the famous 4-lens-Triplet (invented 1902) to the level of the best double-gauss designs (Olympus 40mm and Contax-G-Planar 45mm). Only the edge-profile-sharpness did not arrive at the level of the Gaussians. It was also edited as aniversary-lenses for both Contax-aniversaries 1992 (60th) and 2002 (70th) – the latter one together with the Contax Aria: a much beloved combination, which I owned once.

Stopped down (to f8-f11) it nearly reaches the performance of the modern Batis 40mm! This lens was very expensive for a 4-lens design (starting at DM 698,00 – later € 449,00)! Due to this probably not too many should have been sold – however, still today it is legendary! The legend is justified by the measured data.

The Angénieux-Zoom 45-90mm f2,8: I could not resist to put this first Photo-Zoom of Angénieux (designed ca. 1964 – delivered exclusively for Leica SL/Leica R from 1968 to 1980!) into this comparison. The reason: in the 1960-70s in Germany, the so called „German doctrine“ was common sense, which says: „No zoom-lens can ever reach the performance of a fixed-focal-length lens!“ I can testimony this myself: that is what I thought at that time, too. And it was unfortunately confirmed, after we bought the first cheap zoom-lenses for amateurs.

For the professional cine-lens sector, this was not true any more since 1956/1960 – when Pierre Angénieux launched the first 4x-cine-zoom-lenses in production … and 10x-zooms since 1964. (More details about this in my article about Pierre Angénieux – a detailed analysis about his photo-zooms will follow soon in this blog.)

Look at the resolution-data of the 45-90mm-Zoom at 45mm: it reaches 96% of Nyquist-frequency on the 62 MP-Sony in the center. It is on par with fixed-focals of that time – and even wide open it surpasses them in the corners!

Finally I put in at the end of the comparison list, the (in my opinion) most under-rated Fujinon-X pancake-lens 27mm f2.8 (corresponding to 43mm at full-frame). It reaches 125% Nyquist at f4.0 on the Fujifilm H-1 (24 MP), has low distortion and perfect CA and corner-sharpness values. It is a bit soft in the corners wide open. Perfect for street-photography!

Berlin, 7. August 2020

fotosaurier – Herbert Börger

P.S.: I personally own all lenses and cameras, about which I am writing here in my blog. There are no lenses, which the maker or distributer has given to me for free or temporarily. And as you see, there is no advertisement in my blog… and I do not ask for other „support“ from you than that you tell me, if you have found an error. Of course, you are welcome to share your own experience with us in comments.

PPS: Parallel to the Sony A7R4 I shot the same scene with the 50mm f3.5 lens on the Fujifilm GFX100 (also stopped down to f8.0) – which corresponds exactly to the 40mm focal lenth on 24x36mm. See the following detail of the Montbretia blossoms – here again the rightmost blossom with stamens is exactly in the focal plane. The structueres are recorded here even with higher smootheness and plasticity, which is the advantage of the 100 MP sensor, an excelent algorithm and a very good lens as well, which resolves up to 5.051 LP/PH (at f5.6) in the center!

DSCF7459_50mm100%

Bild 8 / picture 8: Detail of same scene with Fujinon 50mm f3.5 on Fujifilm GFX100 at the same distance of 0.9 meters. (height: 1439 pixel)

 

 

Die Qualität historischer Angénieux Foto-Objektive – 1. Festbrennweiten, 1b. Retrofocus-Weitwinkelobjektive, A. 35mm f2.5

Folgend untersuche ich die drei Retrofocus-Objektive, die Angénieux für das Kleinbildformat entwickelt und produziert hat:

  • Retrofocus 35mm f2.5 (R1) – öffentlich vorgestellt in Paris 1950, ab 1953 in großen Mengen geliefert (ca. 45.000 p.a.! – die Hälfte nach USA))
  • Retrofocus 28mm f3.5 (R11) – ebenfalls ab 1953 geliefert
  • Retrofocus 24mm f3.5 (R51/61) – ab 1957 geliefert

(Im Beitragsbild oben von links nach rechts.)

Es gab keine Nachfolge-Modelle und auch kein 20mm-Weitwinkel mehr. Pierre Angénieux sah offensichtlich aufgrund der geringen Stückzahlen  und der Schwierigkeit, ausreichend hohe Preise im Amateur-Fotomarkt durchzusetzen (anders als im Cine-Sektor) zu wenig wirtschaftlichen Nutzen in diesem Segment.

Zur Entwicklung des Retrofocus-Weitwinkelobjektivs und der Geschichte der Firma Pierre Angénieux lesen Sie bitte hier in meinem Blog nach:

Sternstunden der Foto-Optik – Pierre Angénieux

A – Angénieux Retrofocus 35mm f2,5 (R1), 1950-Patent und öffentl. Vorstellung in Paris/1953-Lieferung in Großserie: das berühmte allererste Retrofokus-Objektiv (hier für die Exakta). Zu dem gibt es natürlich keine echten Vorläufer.

Angénieux35f2,5_900
Angénieux Retrofocus 35mm f2.5 (R1) in Fassung für Exakta (E4) – erstes Retrofokus-Weitwinkelobjektiv (1950 in Paris vorgestellt)

Dagegen gestellt (siehe Tabelle unten):

  1. Carl Zeiss Jena Flektogon 35mm f2,8 (Prototypen auch 1950 / Serie 1953)
  2. Schneider Curtagon 35mm f2,8 (1958)
  3. Carl Zeiss Jena Flektogon 35mm f2,8 (2. Rechnung – 1961)
  4. Canon Rangefinder (M39) 35mm f2,0 (1962)
  5. Minolta MD 35mm f1,8 (1968)
  6. Canon FD 35mm f2,0 (1971 – konkave Frontlinse!)
  7. Leica R Summicron II 35mm f2,0 (1977)
  8. State-of-the-art für spiegellos: Sony Zeiss Sonnar 35mm f2,8 (E-Mount, 2015)
  9. Zoom-Vergleich: Tamron 28-75 f2,8 bei 35mm (2019 – mindestens so gut wie Festbrennweite!)

Machen wir uns bewußt, dass wir hier Anfang der 1950er Jahre beim Erscheinen der ersten Retrofokus-Weitwinkelobjektive für Spiegelreflex-Kameras an dem Scheideweg stehen, der den Erfolg der SLR erst ermöglichte: das Hindernis des großen Auflagemaßes, das durch den Spiegel bedingt ist, wird überwunden!

Hier noch ein kleines Detail am Rande: P.Angénieux war bereits ab Erscheinen der Alpa-Reflex SLR-Kamera (1944) in Kontakt mit dem Hersteller und lieferte auch unmittelbar Mitte der 1940er Jahren Normalobjektive und Teleobjektive zur Alpa. Da die Alpa-Reflex ein ungewöhnlich kleines Auflagemaß von 37,8 mm besaß (Exakta und fast alle anderen liegen bei 44,5 mm!) schaffte es Angénieux bereits in den Jahren ab 1947 ein 35mm-Weitwinkel für die Alpa zu liefern – das „Typ X1“ 35mm f3,5, ein ganz normaler Tessar-Typ. Das einzige nicht-Retrofokus-35er für eine SLR, das mir bekannt ist. Es sollen ca. 200 Objektive gefertigt worden sein. Für alle anderen Kleinbild-SLR galt damals noch die 40mm-Grenze der Brennweite. Wer Lust hat sich von der Qualität eines normalen 40er-Jahre-Tessars zu überzeugen, muss allerdings für das 38 Gramm schwere Objektiv heute mit einem Preis von ca. € 2.500 rechnen …

Besonders gespannt war ich natürlich auf den Vergleich mit dem zeitgenössischen „Rivalen“, dem Carl Zeiss Jena Flektogon 35mm f2.8. Hier gibt es das Problem, dass im Zeiss-Jena Werk (unter Dr. Harry Zöllner und Rudolf Solisch) es für das ursprüngliche Flektogon 35mm zwei optische Konstruktionen gab (1953 und 1961) – wobei die zweite Variante nacheinander (bis 1976, als es durch das neue 35mm f2,4 ersetzt wurde) in drei verschiedenen Gehäusedesigns vorliegt: Guttapercha, Zebra und Gummiring. Viele der ganz frühen Exemplare, die am Gebrauchtmarkt gehandelt werden, haben mehr oder weniger kräftige Schleier und sind teilweise völlig unbrauchbar. Nach einiger Suche, fand ich von der ersten Version in Alu/Silber (M42) eines mit schön klaren Linsen – meine zweite Version (Exakta) hat das Gehäuse mit Gummiring (das „jüngste“ – nach 1975 – und seltenste) und ist noch in gutem, klaren Zustand.

Hier die Auflösungsvergleich-Tabelle:

Ich weise darauf hin, dass die Auswahl der Vergleichsoptiken nicht marktrepräsentativ ist sondern sich aus dem Bestand meines Objektivbesitzes ergab.

Vergleich 35mm-Objektive
Auflösungsvergleich einiger 35mm-Brennweiten für SLR ab 1950 bis heute – gemessen an Kamera Sony A7Rm4 (60 MP) – Nyquist-Frequenz: 3.168 LP/PH (Imatest)

In den 50er Jahren kamen unmittelbar nach dem 35er Angénieux praktisch von allen Objektivherstellern äquivalente Retrofokus-Weitwinkelobjektive für SLR heraus:

Retro-Flekto_Curta
Erstlinge im physischen Vergleich: Angénieux Retrofocus 35f2.5 (Exakta), Zeiss Jena Flektogon 35f2.8 (M42), Schneider Curtagon 35f2,8 (Alpa)

Man sieht gleich auf diesem Bild, dass die zunächst exorbitanten Dimensionen der Frontlinsen und der Baulängen schnell schrumpften, nachdem man davon abging, eine einfache Zerstreuungslinse vor ein „Grundobjektiv“ zu setzen sondern anstatt dessen ein „integriertes“ Gesamtobjektiv entwarf. Ich verzichte hier auf Linsenschnitte, da diese bereits überall dokumentiert sind – der Artikel würde sonst vollends ausufern. Demnächst werde ich noch entsprechende Literaturangaben hinzufügen.

Weitere wichtige Neuerscheinungen der ersten Jahre (neben den Objektiven in der obigen Tabelle) waren z.B.: Enna Lithagon 35mm f4.5 (1953), Meyer-Optik Primagon 35mm f4.5 (1956),  Schacht Travegon 35 f3.5 R (1956), Topcon Topcor 35 f2.8 (1957), Zeiss-Ikon Contarex 35 f4.0 (1957), Takumar 35mm f4.0 (1957), Auto-Takumar 35mm f2.3 (1958), Enna Super-Lithagon 35mm f1.9 (1958), Isco Westron 35mm f3.5 (1958), Canon 35mm f2.5 (R-Bajonett – 1960), Nikkor 35 f2.8 (1962), Nikkor 35 f2.0 (1965).

Als gesichert kann gelten, dass das Zeiss Jena (interne Prototypen 1950 sicher bekannt!) und Angénieux (Muster 1950 öffentlich auf dem Fotosalon in Paris vorgestellt!) tatsächlich gleichzeitig an ihren Produkten arbeiteten. Klar ist auch, dass Angénieux mit dem früheren Patent und der früheren Veröffentlichung (beides 1950) die Nase vorne hatte. Jenas Prototypen von 1950 basierten auf einer Rechnung von 1949 und wurden wieder verworfen. Die Optiken, die 1953 geliefert wurden basierten auf einer neuen Rechnung von 1952! Wer als erster hinaus geht, trägt immer das Risiko, dass es noch keine Erfahrungen mit dem neuen Produkt gibt. Dass die Nachfolger davon lernen konnten, bis sie 2-4 Jahre später nachzogen, ist gewiss – aber wieviel? Damals wurde Optik noch manuall gerechnet. Es heiß, dass zwei Konstrukteure für ein typisches Linsensystem 2 Jahre Rechen-/Entwicklungszeit brauchten. Angénieux behauptete, dass er 10-fach schneller rechnete (ohne Computer), was plausibel erscheint, wenn man sich die schnelle Folge der neuen Objektive in dieser kleinen Firma Mitte der 1950er ansieht.

Zur optischen Qualität (einige Messdiagramme finden Sie unterhalb des Textes):

Ich betrachte Angénieux‘ ersten Entwurf als ausgewogen – die Auflösung am Rand liegt auch im Vergleich zu den bis dahin üblichen besten Weitwinkel-Meßsucherobjektiven im guten bis sehr guten Bereich. Zum Verständnis: 406 Linienpaare je Bildhöhe (LP/PH) bei Offenblende (f2.5!!) im Rand/Ecken-Bereich entsprechen 34 Linien/mm – was bei Modern Photography für Offenblende Weitwinkel an Rand/Ecke damals zu einem „Excelent“-Rating geführt hätte. Abgeblendet erreicht das Objektiv für die damalige Analog-Fotografie völlig gleichmäßige Auflösung – und übertrifft in der Mitte (bis 50% des Bildkreises) die Nyquist-Frequenz der Sony A7Rm2/3! Hier noch die bildliche Veranschaulichung der 406 LP/PH bzw. 34 L/mm in der Bildecke:

#TargetCornerUR_corr_AngénRetro35f2,5_f2,5
Angénieux 35mm f2.5 bei f2.5 in der unteren rechten Bildecke – hier ist die Vignettierung kompensiert: sichtbare Auswirkung der hohen CA auf den sagittalen Strahl (60 MP – 100%-Ansicht)

Bei allen Angénieux-Weitwinkeln (am stärksten beim 24mm f3.5!) hat man größten Wert auf eine sehr geringe, im Bild fast nicht mehr wahrnehmbare VERZEICHNUNG gelegt – und dafür erhebliche CA-Werte in Kauf genommen.

Über die nächsten 20 Jahre wird laut Tabelle offensichtlich die Offenblenden-Ecken-Auflösung der Weitwinkel nicht gravierend gesteigert werden – erst ab Anfang/Mitte der 1970 gibt es einen wirklichen Durchbruch mit neuen Glassorten (und vollends dann ab ca. 1983/84 mit ED-Glas): schönstes Beispiel das Summicron II 35mm f2.0 von 1977!

Anders sieht es beim Flektogon 35mm f2.8 von 1950/1953 aus Jena aus: die Rand-/Ecken-Auflösung bei Offenblende ist „unterirdisch“ und kommt auch bei Abblenden nicht ausreichend hoch. Die Mittenauflösung erscheint vor allem beim Abblenden stark übersteigert. Das war leider ein Flop… Daher sah sich Zeiss Jena veranlasst, zehn Jahre später (1960) eine Neurechnung durchzuführen um konkurrenzfähig zu werden – wahrscheinlich ist es eine der ersten Objektiv-Berechnungen, die mit dem neuen Computersystem in Jena (OPREMA) durchgeführt wurde (?). Diese Neuberechnung des Flektogon 35mm f2.8 (geliefert ab 1961) ist dann ein Spitzenoptik nach dem damaligen Stand der Technik! Anscheinend war es notwendig, dafür wesentlich höhere Verzeichnung und deutlich höhere CA in Kauf zu nehmen als ursprünglich geplant.

Zur Illustration hier die Bilder der Auflösungs-Targets in der unteren Rechten Ecke (UR) bei Offenblende (dunkel, da ich die Vignettierung nicht korrigiert habe):

Vergleich_35mm_EckeUR
Auflösungs-Targets bei Offenblende untere Rechte Ecke (UR) v.l.n.r.:                  Angénieux35mm,                   Flektogon35mm-I,                          Flektogon35mm-II

Bei der Neugerechnung ist die Eckenauflösung nun erkennbar besser als beim Angénieux – Zeiss-Jena ist rehabilitiert!

Bemerkenswert finde ich, wie der Schneider-Curtagon-Entwurf die Größe des Objektivs verringert und gleichzeitig die Qaulität deutlich verbessert. Nicht nur die Auflösung übertrifft deutlich ihre Vorgänger-Konkurrenten – auch hat es noch geringere Verzeichnung als das Angénieux und exzellente CA-Werte! Das Schacht Travegon 35mm f3.5 R von 1956 hat etwa das gleiche Qualitätsniveau wie das Curtagon – ist aber nicht ganz so kompakt.

Das Canon FD 35mm f2.0 S.S.C. ist der Exot mit der nach vorne konkaven Frontlinse und Thorium-Glas (radioaktiv?). Es ist das größte und massivste der hier geprüften 35er – und ziemlich gleichauf in der optischen Leistung mit dem Minolta W.Rokkor-X 35mm f1.8, das im Vergleich ein Zwerg ist. Diese um 1970 entstandene Objektiv-Gruppe stellt eine  optische Verbesserung gegenüber dem Angénieux dar – aber nur graduell (besonders bei der Chromatischen Aberration – und abgeblendet am Rand). Bei der Lichtstärke liegt natürlich der eigentliche Fortschritt dieser Objektive – bei Erhaltung des Qualitätsniveaus – eine ähnliche Herausforderung wie es die weitere Vergrößerung des Bildwinkels darstellen wird. Das schon 3 Jahre vor dem Minolta-Objektiv entstandene Nikkor mit Lichtstärke 2.0 kenne ich leider nicht.

Schon in meinen Analog-Fotografie-Zeiten war das Summicron-R II 35mm f2.0 (1977) die absolute Referenz – eine wahre Freude, nicht nur in der Auflösung (die notwendig – aber nicht ALLES ist!). Überraschend finde ich, dass diese Optik noch heute (an hochauflösenden DigitalSensoren) so gut mithalten kann!

Mein „modernstes“ 35er, das (für die spiegellose Digitalkamera gerechnete) Zeiss Sony Sonnar 35mm f2,8 ist ein auf extreme KOMPAKTHEIT getrimmtes Objektiv mit sehr geringer Verzeichnung und CA, das dafür auf Spitzenwerte der Auflösung verzichtet. Es gibt heute extreme, lichtstarke Rechnungen mit 14 – 16 Linsen, die über 1 kg wiegen und schon bei Offenblende die Leistung einer 60 MP-Kamera über das gesamte Bildfeld ausreizen.

Fazit: das Angénieux Retrofocus 35mm f2.5 hat zu Recht den Ruf von Angénieux als Innovator und Hersteller von Objektiven sehr hoher Qualität begründet – zumal es praktisch bis Anfang der 70er Jahre auf dem Stand der Technik blieb! Wir werden in Kürze weiter sehen, wie er sich bei den folgenden kürzeren Weitwinkel-Brennweiten geschlagen hat.

AngénRetro35f2,5_f2,5_Vgl

AngénRetro35f2,5_f11_Vgl
Angénieux Retrofocus 35mm f2.5 bei Offenblende (oben) und optimaler Blende 11 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Vgl_Flektogon35-I_f2,8

Vgl_Flektogon35-I_f11
Zeiss Jena Flektogon I  35mm f2.8 bei Offenblende (oben) und optim. Blende 11 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Flektogon35f2,8-5501_f2,8_Vgl

Vgl_Flektogon-II_f8
Zeiss Jena Flektogon II  35mm f2.8 bei Offenblende (oben) und optim. Blende 8 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Vgl_Curtagon35f2,8

Vgl_Curtagon35f2,8_f11
Schneider Curtagon 35mm f2.8 bei Offenblende (oben) und optim. Blende 11 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Vgl_SummicronR35f2,0_2,0

Vgl_SummicronR35f2,0_f8
Leitz Summicron-R 35mm f2.0 II bei Offenblende (oben) und optim. Blende 8 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Vgl_SonySonnar35f2,8_f2,8

Vgl_SonySonnar35f2,8_f11
Sony Sonnar 35mm f2.8 (E-Mt) bei Offenblende (oben) und optim. Blende 11 (unten) – Kantenprofil, MTF-Kurve und Auflösung über Bildkreisradius

Copyright Fotosaurier, Berlin, 3. März 2020