Sony A7R4 (61 MP) vs Agfa APX100 (B&W-Film) – Analog vs Digital comparison

This article describes, how I made the resolution-power of lenses digitally measurable on analog film  and COMPARABLE to the data, which are directly measured on digital sensors – using the same algorithm: IMATEST.

Since a long time I am looking for an experimental set-up, which allows me to understand, how the information content of the exposure on an analog film compares to the digital data from a digital sensor – looking through the same lens. Resolution being the main point of interest for me in this case.

Just to give you a quick impression of my results I show here the resolution charts from IMATEST on B&W-film (Agfa APX100) and on Sony A7R4 (61 MP), using the same Olympus SLR-lens OM 28mm f/2.8 (introduced 1973) – (the method will be explained in detail further down in this article):

Fig. 1: Resolution-chart, generated with Olympus OM Zuiko Auto-W 28mm f/2.8 lens on black and white negative film (Agfa APX100) and filmscanner reflecta RPS 10M – MTF30-resolution-values from center to corner for all apertures – source: fotosaurier

I do not think, that these are the „real“ limiting MTF30 resolutions values of the lens. These may be definitely higher – especially in the range betweenf f/5.6 and f/16. For me the purpose of the method is, to clarify the behavior of many (legendary!) historical lenses which show very low resolution values especially in the corners and at stop-down values of f/16 or f/22.

Let us take a look at the digital picture, taken with the Sony A7R4:

Ima_GRAPH_OM28f2,8_A7R4
Fig. 2: Resolution-chart, generated with Olympus OM Zuiko Auto-W 28mm f/2.8 lens on 62 MP-Sensor of Sony A7R4 – MTF30-resolution-values from center to corner for all apertures – source: fotosaurier

Do not let you confuse by the blue lines on different levels, which represent the Nyquist-Frequency in each set-up: the Sony’s sensor has a Nyquist Frequency of 3.168 LP/PH (linepairs per picture hight) – the filmscanner which was used to digitize the analog picture (reflecta RPS 10M) was used at ist max. resolution of 5.000 ppi – that corresponds to 2.383 LP/PH as a Nyquist Frequency and delivers ca. 33 MegaPixel pictures.

There is no affordable filmscanner with higher resolution on the market!

This means: the Nyquist Frequency of the Sony Digicam is exactly 25% higher than that of the scanner, which wich we used as a A/D-converter for the B+W-negatives on the APX100-film.

The highest resolution in the film-based pictures generated with the analog-digital data-processing chain in Fig. 1 is very close to or above the Nyquist Frequency of the scanner – and over the full format area of 24mm x 36mm the resolution in the analog film is gathering very closely under or around this Nyquist Frequency at nearly all apertures, with the exception of open aperture f/2.8 where it is 10-20% lower.

In contrary to that, in the digital pictures taken with the Sony Sensor (Nyquist Frequency: 3.168 LP/PH) the resolutions vary strongly between corners and center and in between (part way) – and for the different apertures.

Let’s look at the center-values of resolution (green curves in Fig 1 + 2): between f/2.8 and f/11 the analog and digital values develop quite constant around the respective Nyquist Frequency, which explains, that the center values on film are 25% lower than on the 62 MP-sensor. But: The drop-off in resolution at f/16 and f/22 on the digital sensor is dramatical and shows that it is a sensor-created artefact.

Looking at the grey curves in Figs 1 + 2: „part way“ between center and corner represents the biggest area of the picture, dominating the perception of the picture! Here the MFT 30 resolution values are higher on film at nearly all apertures in spite of the lower Nyquist Frequency.

The most dramatical difference between analog and digital pictures, however, is – as expected! – in the corners (yellow curves on Figs 1 + 2):

For a better understanding I put the corner-resolution of film and sensor together in one graph:

Fig. 3: Olympus OM 28mm f/2.8 corner resolution on Sony A7R4 (yellow curve) and b+w-film APX100 (grey curve) – source: fotosaurier

The corner-resolution on the sensor with 25% higher Nyquist Frequency starts at f/2.8 at 50% of that of the analog film, exceeds the absolute analog value at f/8, peaks at f/11 with 82% of the sensors Nyquist and drops below the analog-value at f/22, whereas the analog-resolution on film reaches 95% of Nyquist at f/5.6 and stays at about 90% until f/22.

What the resolution-graphs here clearly show: also the very low resolutions in the corners (and even part-way!) of the digital sensor (especially open aperture!) are an artefact of the sensor! We know, that most of the effect is caused by the thick filter stack in front of the sensor. With this picture we know, that this happens not only with rangefinder-lenses, where the corners are literally BLURRED on the sensor – but also with SLR-lenses as in this case! With rangefinder-lenses the difference in corner resolution between analog (film) and digital (sensor) may be 6 to 7 … whereas with SLR-lenses I experience values of 2 to 3.

I confirm again: it is the identical lens in both cases! And these results are pretty much representative for many analog lenses! I will supply you with the results of many more lenses soon. There is one (rangefinder-)lens already analysed with the same method (link here).

EXPLAINING the Method in detail:

1. Extending the digital IMATEST lens testing method and software to pictures taken on analog film:

A. Measuring the optical performance on a digital sensor is facing several facts and influences, which are new and specific: pixel size, algorithm, problems of digital signal-processing systems like aliasing, additional optical elements in the optical path like filter stacksand micro-lenses!

The question: is there an essential influence of all these optical systems on the visual result in the picture over the picture-circle (Bildkreis), e.g. because of the varying angles at which the light-rays hit on the sensors between center and the farthest corner of the picture format or due to the additional optical elements introduced into the light-path?

In the case of RANGEFINDER-lenses we know, that there often is a strong influence of this. These lenses are often made for a very short distances between the last lens and the film – especially for wideangle- and standard-lenses. Little was known to me about historical SLR-lenses, which were never planned and calculated for the use with modern digital sensors. The degradation of the picture quality in the corners of rangefinder-wideangle-lenses is so dramatical, that it is clearly seen, that this is an artefact of the sensor, because we see sharp corners on film with the same lens.

Since several years I do quite a few measurements on historical lenses, using a high-resolution digital sensor with 62 Mega-Pixels, resulting in 60,2 MP effectively on Full Format (35mm stills).

Until now I did not know, whether the measurement of my historical SLR-lens is falsified due to artefacts, generated by the digital recording system. The work, described in this article, was done, to clearify this situation.

I just want to know: how does picture quality of historical SLR-lenses on the analog film compare measurably to that delivered by digital sensors?

Digital cameras are really big number-crunching-machines! And with the right software, I can use the numbers to generate a numerical picture of  the optical quality of the lens-sensor-combination. IMATEST is such a software and it uses standardised TARGETS to do that. I use the following target:

DSC03033_Macr-Yashica_55f2,8_5,6-foc Kopie
Fig 5: SFRplus target for Imatest – it’s height is 783 mm between the horizontal black bars, which means, that the reproduction ratio on film is 33:1 – source: fotosaurier/Imatest – original information graphics from IMATEST

Over years I did – like many other amateur-photographers – compare real-world photos of analog vs. digital processing. But I was never satisfied, because this method gave me only subjective impressions – it did not create reproducible figures, to generate a precise description of the results!

I collected intensive experience with IMATEST on more than 150 lenses over meanwhile 5-6 years using the digital pictures generated by digital sensors (4,9 to 102 Megapixels) of seven different DIGICAMS. During this time, my Standard Digicam to compare lenses was (and still is) Sony A7R4 (62 Megapixels) – since it had arrived in the market (2018/19).

IMATEST (Studio) software delivers MTF-based resolution data – as it can do that separately in three RGB-channels, it also delivers lateral CA-data. Using the Target structure of Fig. 5, the software selects 46 local areas, and runs the MTF-measurement automatically for all these 46 areas. The following picture demonstrates the automatic areas, which are typically selected – but you could choose others as well:

ROI-chart (standard)
Fig. 6: The 46 magenta rectangles (called „ROI„) frame the Edges in the target, at which the 46 MTF-measurements are made – source: fotosaurier/Imatest

These are the curves, which are generated from each digital picture (black&white):

Zusammenstellung_IMATEST_A7R4_OM28d2,8_2,8
Fig. 7: Summary of the  IMATEST-results for the OM28mm f/2.8 at open aperture f/2.8 on Sony 62 MP-sensor (A7R4) – explanation see text beneath – source: fotosaurier

The upper left curve shows the edge-profile at center of the target (ROI no. 1, which is the left (vertical) edge of the center square in Fig. 6). From this graph the edge-rise between 10% and 90% is taken from the x-coordinate in pixels. The lower left curve is the MTF-curve (contrast over spatial frequency) for the same location. From this graph the MTF30 value (Frequency at 30% contrast) is taken: follow the horizontal line at 0,3 MTF-value to its section with the curve and take the frequency on the abscissa. The right curve shows the MTF30-values of ALL 46 ROIs plotted over the distance from the center in the 35mm-fframe.

I have resumed the IMATEST test-method in more detail in this article here in my blog!

B. Digital measurement of resolution on analog film

Now I decided to make the following experiment:

  • Take a photograph of the IMATEST-target on analog film;
  • digitize the picture with a film-scanner;
  • analyse the resulting digital picture with IMATEST.

For the tests, which I describe here, I used the following hardware:

28mmf2,8-on-OM4Ti_DSCF1655_blog
Fig. 8: Analog SLR Olympus OM-4 Ti with Zuiko Auto-W 28mm f/2.8, loaded with „fresh“ Agfa APX100
  • Camera for the shooting on analog-film: Olympus OM-4Ti
  • Lens: Olympus Zuiko Auto-W 28mm f/2.8 (Ser.no. 232073)
  • Film: B&W negative film AgfaPhoto APX100, iso125, developed in Rodinal 1+25 (8′)
  • Scanner: reflecta RPS 10M film scanner

The OM-4Ti (about 25 years old) and the lens (nearly 50 years old) work still perfect. I let the OM-4Ti automatically generate the exposure time: from 0.4 seconds to 1/250 seconds. The densitiy of the negatives was pretty constant on the film-strip! I use a sturdy tripod, which is made for use with long astronomical telescopes.

With this method I hope to use the full analyzing-power of IMATEST-software on a picture-frame, which is generated through the lens WITHOUT the typical artefacts, which digital sensors MAY generate in the optical path of a historical lens.

ON THE FILM we have now the IMATEST target-pattern, which allows to make a fast and powerfull analysis of optical data over the full picture frame – also very close to the edges and into the corners. This pattern is superimposed by the typical grain-structure of the light sensitive layer – and potential light-diffusion-effects within the film thickness. Both (analog) effects LIMIT the resolution, which can be achieved on FILM.

My first and major interest was always focused on the observation of the enormous difference between the center-resolution (see Fig. 7), which is digitally measured on A7R4 with ca. 3,000 LP/PH or higher) and corner-resolutions of 400-600 LP/PH on the sensor .

The question is: are the low values on edges and in coners of the frame, measured with the digital sensors, an artefact, caused by the different light-path? We know definitely about these effects with rangefinder-lenses, which have a very short back-distance between last lens and film, causing big trouble on sensors of mirrorless cameras. This is today well known, to be mainly caused by the thick filter-stacks in front of the sensors (creating field-curvature and cromatic aberrations with analog lenses).

It has been shown, that this can partly be „cured“ – or at least reduced – by reducing or deleting the filter-stack, and/or putting a positive lens (so-called „PCX-filter“) in front of the lens-sensor-combination.

The 35mm-negative-film:

I made my first attempts to photograph the IMATEST-target on film with

  • b&w-film Agfa APX100, iso 100

which is still available as „fresh“ product. For this first step I decided to stay with b&w-film, because I can process it myself under controlled conditions.

I did the devellopment of the b&w-film myself with Rodinal.

The A/D-converting:

The negatives were digitized through my film-scanner reflecta RPS 10M,which offers a maximum linear resolution of 10,000 pixel per inch (PPI).

To me, this step seemed to be very important: to avoid new artefacts from the digitizing algorithm. So I chose a spatial frequency, which is higher than the expected limiting spatial frequency of the film: I set the scanner at 5,000 ppi. On pixel-level this corresponds to an imaging-sensor of ca. 33.7 MP (for 24mm x 36mm).

From my earlier estimations I had found, that a normal recording film for general imaging purposes should correspond to a digital FullFormat-sensor with 20-12 MP.

The picture height, which the scanner digitally delivers (24mm minus a bit of crop to frame the target safely), was 4,676 pixels and so the „Nyquist Frequency“ of the scanner set-up corresponds to 2,338 LP/PH – corresponding to an effective sensor-size of 32,7 Mpxls.

Fig. 7 shows the b&w-picture, which was generated with the scanner:

AGFA100_OM28f2,8_2,8_H4536
Fig. 7: Scanner-output from the b&w negative-film Agfa APX100 from Olympus OM 28mm f/2.8 at full aperture f/2.8. Picture-hight of this original scan is 4.676 Pxls. You see, that the light-fall-off of this lens into the corners is very moderate … and the linear distortion with exactly 1% acceptable as well! – source: fotosaurier

Let’s have a closer look into the structure of this image – in Fig. 7a you get an impression of the grain structure of the films emulsion at about 200% enlargement of the 33 MP-image:

Enlargement-Film-200%
Fig. 7a: Overview of the grain-structure at ca. 200% enlagement of original scan in Fig. 7. The pixel-size here is 5,3 µm – the grains of the film are bigger than the pixels – source: fotosaurier

Following picture is the MTF-curve of the analog image „as scanned“ (in the center of frame):

Fig 8: MTF-curve in. Center (ROI no.1) of OM-Zuiko 28mm f/2.8 at f/2.8 – source: fotosaurier

The „noise“ in the curve is caused by the film-grain, which is about the same size as pixels.

Film_3024-pixel-height_at-800%
Fig. 9: Here we look at about 1,000% into the pixel-structure of the scanned image. At the edges of the dark rectangle (where the resolution is analysed!) the grain-diameter is about the same size. Only some local „grain-clusters“ are considerably bigger – source: fotosaurier

Previous trials had shown, that with a film with this grain-structure, this digital image-size would give adequate results for MTF and resolution.

In the case of a digital sensor of a digicam I avoided generally to use RAW-data, which would have urged me to use my own very personal „development-parameters“ in Lightroom or other software to generate the final picture. I use OOC-JPEG-Data at „Standard“-settings, due to generate conditions (all important parameters set to „zero“), which are transparent and reproducible for everybody with the same camera-model! That means: it would also have been possible to create pictures with much higher resolution results in Imatest, e.g. by setting higher sharpening-parameters or the „clear“-mode.

Now with a film-scanner I had to go myself through a very intensive process of defining the „development-parameters“ in Silverfast. Starting with the setting to 5.000 ppi for the basic scan-resolution. With 10.000 ppi, which is offered with this model, you will get no REAL increase in EFFECTIVE resolution.

However, using the „Multiple Scan Mode“, you extend the accessible resolutions above the „Nyquist Frequency“, which would be 2.383 LP/PH, corresponding to a Picture size of 32,7 MP

My target was, to reach about the same level of resolution in the center of the scanned images on analog film as with the Sony A7R4 images, which means in the range of 3.168 LP/PH, which is the Nyquist Frequency of the Sony Sensor.

This corresponds with a resolution of 260 Lines/mm.

I came close to this with the following settings:

Fig. 10: Scan-parameters in Silverfast 8 on film-scanner RPS 10M – source: fotosaurier

See the complete results here:


Fig. 11: Analog on film resolution results of Olympus OM 28mm f/2.8 SLR-lens with b+w-film APX100, scanned with RPS 10M film-scanner – source: fotosaurier

The interpretation of this in comparison with the measurement-results on the 62 MP-sensor of the Sony A7R4 (Fif. 2) has been given in the first section of the Article.

Finally I asked myself, whether a PCX-filter (lens) could improve the resolution-artefacts which are found on the sensor? But I found no real positive effect.

Fig. 12: Resolution of OM 28mm f/2.8 lens with PCX-3m lens on the Sony A7R4-sensor: no improvement at all – source fotosaurier

Copyright „fotosaurier“

Herbert Börger, Berlin, November 2023

My Crazy Lenses – Topcor R 30cm f/2.8 and its Modern State-of-the-Art Counterparts – „Supertele-Lenses“

  1. Travel on my time-machine
  2. The known Facts – Topcor 30cm f/2.8
  3. Topcor 30cm f/2.8 – Optical Performance
  4. The Reference: Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM
  5. Three more 300mm f/2.8-teles

DSCF2458_Alle300f2,8-5_blog
Fig 1: From left to right – Topcor R 30cm f/2.8, Arsat Yashma 300mm f/2.8, Tamron SP LD (IF) 300mm f/2.8, Minolta AF Apo-Tele 300mm f/2.8, Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS USM

I part from my „crazy lenses“ due to my age: it takes too much time to take care for my optical baybies! If you are interested in the Topcor R 30cm f/2.8, please leave a price-proposal in the comment-section (this is seen only by me) or by mail to webmaster@fotosaurier.de

1. On my time-machine:

I own the Topcor R 30cm f/2.8, which I am looking at here, since a few years – but I have not used it too often.  It is very heavy, long and dark, giving the impression of a tank-breaking weapon: you definitely will get trouble at any security check nowadays … and in the best case you will earn compassion instead of admiration! Too bad, because it is an ingenious piece of optical engineering.

Information about Topcor lenses today are rare and not always reliable. I will restrict myself to reliable information and I will try to verify legends … or destroy them.

So I entered my time machine and travelled back into the year 1958. I was 13 years old at my arrival there – and at the Topcon (Tokyo Kogaku) factory I met a team of innovative engineers, who were fanatically burning for the QUALITY of their products – and really proud of it! The year before (1957) they had introduced a new SLR-camera (Topcon R), which was designed in Bauhaus-style, i.e. with clear and modern lines – and they were ready to ignit a firework of innovations around the SLR-concept within the next few years (from first-in-industry TTL-exposure-metering to first electric winder).

And they had introduced a line of lenses for this SLR-system-camera, among which the Topcor 30cm f/2.8 peaked out. Another „first-in-industry“-innovation.

I looked around in the photo-stores and could not find any Canon- or Nikon-SLRs there: the dealers told me, that both companies were just bringing out SLRs. It seemed, that the Topcon-people had considered the German SLRs, which were already on the market, as their competition. Personally at that time I was already a SLR-user (of my father’s Contaflex – which means, that from time to time my father was still allowed to use it himself).

Everybody, who is acqainted with the rules of the market, would have expected, that shortly after an innovation like the Topcor R 30cm f/2.8, the major competitors would bring out a similar product.

But that did not happen – so I returned in my time-machine. Finally I found out, that it took the new japanese competitors more than a decade! And there was no comparable Lens in Europe, as far as I could see. 13 years later Nikon presented a prototype, to be tested during the Olympic Winter Games of Sapporo in 1972.

The real next step was taken by Canon with a 300mm f/2.8 Lens for their new FD-System, using a lens made of FLUORITE in 1973 (some say 75)! This was finally 16 years after the arrival of the Topcor-lens … and just in that year, when Topcon stopped the production of their supertele-lens.

2. The known facts:

This Topcor R 30cm f/2.8 monster-tele-lens with 300mm focal length was presented to the world in 1958 („Topcon Club“ says 1957!) – one year before Canon or Nikon started to produce any SLR – and 13-16 years before any other lens- or camera-maker presented such a fast 300mm tele-lens. Not only at the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo but all the time until 1972 it was without any competition. As a consequence, there even was produced quite a number of lenses with Nikon mounts! Next to Topcon, Canon brought out its Canon FD 300mm f/2.8 S.S.C. Fluorite lens in 1973 – setting the level for professional superlele-lenses for the next decades and until today.  Just a few years later Topcon went completly out of the business with SLR-cameras and lenses. Sad, but even the extensive book „Topcon Story“  by Marco Antonetto and Claudio Russo (1) does not answer the question „why?“.  Today Topcon is a market-leader in geodesic instruments.

Stephen Gandy (3) estimates –  cameraquest.com  – that 700-800 lenses have been produced in total during 18 years of production.

Topcor-R-300f2,8_DSCF2335_blog
Fig. 2a: R.Topcor 1:2.8 f=300mm on Topcon SuperD- source: fotosaurier

Titel_DSCF2320
Fig. 2b: R.Topcor 1:2.8 f=300mm – source: fotosaurier

R328cut
Fig. 2c: Lens scheme of Topcor 1:2.8 30cm  – source: http://www.topgabacho.jp/Topconclub/lens3.htm

The lens is made of six single lenses in four groups – of which lens no. 6 (group 4) is the filter (diameter 39mm), which is, of course, part of the optical design! This filter is an early (maybe the first) example of a filter which is positioned in a slot in the rear part of the lens-body. In the book „Topcon Story“ (page 128) there is an error in the spreadsheet listing of the data of the R.Topcor-lenses: the data in the last line are the data of the „300mm 2.8“ and not of the f/5.6-lens. Here the no. of elements is „five“, which is correct, when you don’t count the filter as an active optical member …

The lens has a preset diaphragm and has a built-in sunshade (telescoping in two stages!). It is 383 mm long (from camera-flange to front-edge of the pulled-back sunshade – total length with shade pulled out is 477 mm)  and weighs 3.1 kgs (without front and rear caps). Measured at my sample (ser. no. 34.1359). The initial sales-price was $ 1.125,–. (In the literature  you will find: 415/412 mm length and 3.3 kgs weight).

It may be interesting to mention here, that right away from the introduction of the first Topcon-SLR, an extremely ambitious lens-program was planned – however, realized only partly. The Topcor R 13,5 cm f/2.0 (6 lenses) had also preset diaphragm and it was discontinued with the Topcon RE camera system – so it is said to be extremely rare. It has a yellowish color cast (due to rare-earth-glass?), not a big problem with todays digital cameras …

However, a 50mm f/0.7 lens, which is mentioned in „Topcon Club“ only, was never made for the SLR-camera market – maybe, this was one of the very early oscilloscope-registration-lenses, which are also known from Germany and GB even at WWII-times.

And a 1000mm f/7 catadioptric lens was only experimentally made in 1958.

„Topcon Club“ (2) writes about this:

„The interchangeable lenses which appeared with the appearance of TOPCON R are various kinds of the Auto Topcor of 35mm/100mm, and R TOPCOR (a preset diaphragm) of 90mm/135mm/200mm/300mm among these – although the bright thing and the dark thing were prepared about 135mm and 300mm – it should mention especially – it is the „high-speed lens“ of 135mm f2 and 300mm f2.8. 50mm f0.7 – such a bright lens was already completed during wartime by the Tokyo optics. Do you believe it ? Although possibly this grade was an easy thing, even so, the 300mm f2.8 lens will be an astonishment thing in 1957. I talked in detail on „the page of TOPCOR“ about this lens. We have to wait for marketing of the product of NIKON which is the next 300mm f2.8 lens at any rate till 1977. However, TOPCON did not build the super telephoto lens 500mm /800mm those days. Furthermore, the Refrector Topcor 1000mm f7 is appearing in the catalog in ’59. However, this was not launched regretfully.“

Later – from 1969 on – a RE Topcor 500mm f/5.6 telephoto-lens was even produced with automatic diaphragm and meter coupling!

Can such a fast long telephoto lens like this early 300mm f/2.8-design without Fluorite- or ED-lenses be any good – on the scale of professional photography? There are hints, that rare-earth glasses were used to make these lenses (also for the other famous 13,5cm f/2.0, also supplied since 1958). But I do not know details about this.

I will answer the question about the optical quality here – also comparing this lens with a modern top-notch tele-lenses like Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS USM, which I personally classify as today’s state-of-the-art reference, supported by photo-friend Thomas, who borrowed his Canon lens to me.

Finally I will take a glance on a state-of-the-art modern astronomical refractor, which normally does perform at diffraction-limited resolution on stars!

Topcor 30cm f/2.8 – The Optical Performance on analog film (year 1969):

Stephen Gandy (3) wrote in his blog:

WIDE OPEN its resolution was 56lines/mm center and 34lines/mm at the edges.  By f/8 it was 80 lines/mm center and 65 at the edges.   Many normal lenses don’t achieve this sharpness — much less 300/2.8 leviathans !  Camera 35 summed it up by saying „INCREDIBLY FANTASTIC.“  I would have to agree.

(In the original text in Stephen’s blog, the reported resolution values are noted as „56mm“ or „34mm“. I have taken the freedom, to correct this to what it should read: lines per mm, „lines/mm“!)

The resolution values, which I use in my digital IMATEST measurements, typically are given in „Line-pairs per picture-height“ = „LP/PH“. Picture-height being 24mm with 24×36-format, you have to divide the „lines/mm“-values by two to get to „line-pairs“ – and then multiply with 24 to achieve LP/PH.

The highest given value of 80 lines/mm corresponds to 960 LP/PH stopped down to f/8 in the center or 760 LP/PH at f/8 at the edge – the lowest value 34 lines/mm with open diaphragm at the edge corresponds to 408 LP/PH.

What does that mean?

In 1969 the test results for resolution were measured on film – „Modern Photography“ used Plus-X Pan with standardized development – and the reading of the „just resolved“ line-pattern was done with a standardized enlarging glass … I personally used the method myself at that time, too, and it is quite reproducible as long as the same person does the reading … It is somewhat sensitive to the vision-capabilities of the reading person! And of course the grain of the analog film material (negative b&w film!) is the limiting factor for the resolution-reading on film for really high resolutions.

Today’s modern 24 MP-sensors deliver resolutions of 2,000-2,400 LP/PH using MTF30 (30% contrast) as  the parameter for reading out the resolution values from the MTF-curve. My Sony A7R4-Camera (62 MP), which I use for my measurements, has a Nyquist frequency of 3.168 LP/PH and delivers up to 3.800 LP/PH-readings with the best known lenses.

The following spreadsheet gives an overview on the physical data of the Topcor-lens and the other lens-monsters, analysed here:

300f2,8_physData
Fig. 3: Physical Data of the five 300mm f/3.8-Lenses – source: measured by fotosaurier

3. Topcor 30cm f/2.8 – Optical Performance

My IMATEST-Results of the optical properties of the Topcor R 30cm f/2.8 lens:

To exclude potential vibration-initiated degradation of resolution in my test-shots at these long focal-lengths I used my heavy (>10 kgs) and sturdy astronomical telescope-mount:

DSCF2537_Topcor_AufAstroMontierung_blog
Fig. 4: My massive astronomical lens mount – here with SonyA7R4 attached to Topcor 30cm f/2.8 – source: fotosaurier

DSCF2535_OnTargetTop
Fig. 5: The set-up keeps the lens and camera steady even at 0,4 seconds. – source: fotosaurier

Following you see the results of my IMATEST-measurements:

Topcor_R-300f2,8_Spreadsheet-23
Fig. 6: Optical measurment-results for Topcor R 300mm f/2.8 adapted to Sony A7R4 with 62 MP – resolution values given in LP/PH – source: fotosaurier

Topcor_R-300f2,8_Graph-23
Fig. 7: Resolution measurement-results for Topcor R 300mm f/2.8 as graph – source: fotosaurier

The lens is unique at that time regarding to „speed“ – an extremely ambitious piece of optical engineering. Remind, that the distortion is practically zero and the CA-area in the center 0,8-1,4 pixel – 1 pixel at Sony A7R4 is 3,8 microns on the sensor!

What is center, what is part way and what is corner? In the following graphs from IMATEST you see: „Part-Way“ is the large part of the picture extending close to the narrow side (left/right). „Corner“ is the narrow area outside the second dotted circle on the picture below.

DSC07122_Topcor300f2,8_8,0_Multi-ROI_2023-02-04_01-00-54
Fig. 8: „Center“ resolution is calculated as mean from the values inside the inner circle (in my setting always two values), „part way“ is the mean of all values between the inner and outer circle, „corner“ is the mean of all values positioned outside the outer circle – source: fotosaurier

DSC07110_Topcor300f2,8_8,0_Lens_MTF_2022-11-29_22-55-46
Fig. 9: Topcor R 30cm f/2.8 resolution plotted over radius of picture circle – source: fotosaurier

So, let’s compare the measurements to the value, that were given in analog times on film:

The comparison in the spreadsheet Fig. 10 shows: The  lens „out-resolves“ normal analog films by far! Stopped down it reaches the limits of the analog medium even at the edges of the frame! 

Analog-digital-resolution
Fig.10: „Camera35’s“ resolution measurements for Topcor R 30cm f(2.8 of 1969 on film compared with digital IMATEST values (at 30% MTF = „MTF30) with Sony A7R4 – source: fotosaurier

I found no real technical explanation, how Topcon-engineers managed to generate this phantastic lens at that time without ED/LD/AD/Fluorite-glass. There is a second tele-lens – the 13,5cm f/2.0, also introduced 1958, with first-in-industry potential – and finally the Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5 super-wide, which surprises with best-in-class resolution values (see my blog-article on historical 24/25mm-lenses!).

If somebody knows the secret: please, tell us!

Look at a sample picture taken with the Topcor at the end of this article at 65% enlargement size (see Fig. 24).

Now, let’s have a glance on some other historical Superteles:

Alle_300er_2,8_DSCF2573
Fig. 11: From left to right: Topcor R 300mm f/2.8, Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM, Minolta AF Apo-Tele 400mm f/2.8, Tamron SP (60B) 300mm f/2.8 LD (IF), Arsat Yashma-4H MC 300mm f/2.8

4. The Reference: Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM

Canon-EF_300f2,8_DSCF2451_blog
Fig. 12: Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM – source: fotosaurier

Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM is rated as the reference of this class of lenses.  In this case it is not the latest „Mk II“-version of it, which came out 2011 –  but the first version of 1999, which is tested here. It represents nevertheless already the top-class of the super-teles (as all its predecessors since 1973!)

Here are the IMATEST results of its optical properties:

Canon-EF_300f2,8-L-IS-USM_AF_Spreadsheet
Fig.13: Optical properties of Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM from my IMATEST-measurements, with autofocus – source: fotosaurier

And here the Graphs of resolutions center, part way and corner:

Canon-EF_300f2,8-L-IS-USM_AF_Graph
Fig. 14: IMATEST-Resolution (LP/PH) of Canon EF 300mm f/2.8 IS USM – center – part way and corners – source: fotosaurier

Not may comments necessary to this – the figures and graphs should speak for itself … Just to mention: the distortion at the Topcor-lens is even lower than that of the Canon – but both are neglectable for a supertele!

Canons leadership in this class of professional supertele-lenses was generated by the policy, not to drop a product into the market, which was „just possible“ at present, but to persue a consequent plan for the future: to solve the „secondary spectrum“-problem of long tele-lenses, which means to use extreme „anormal dispersionlens-materials, which do the job without optical compromising.

So in 1975 – 2 years after Nikons first presentation of its first 300mm f/2.8 ED-lens (which was not very convincing and had to be replaced four years later by the ED-IF-version) – Canon introduced their FD 300mm f/2.8 Fluorite-Supertele, in which they used a front-lens made of fluorite-monocrystal material (no glass!) and a UD-glass-lens. This lens was already praised close to perfect (absence of chromatic aberrrations). Canon accepted for this a compromise, which made the lens longer and heavier: to protect the soft and sensitive fluorite-crystal-material in the front lens, there was a fixed additional plane protection element of glass in front!

Finally new fluorite-glass-formulations became available, which allowed to drop the sensitive crystal-lens. Over the introduction of Autofocus (EOS – 1987) and still more glass-elements, Canon finally introduced the legenday lens EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM in 1999 with very fast AF and image-stabiliser, which is tested here.

Enjoy the results!

5. Finally – three more 300mm f/2.8-teles:

  • Minolta AF APO-Tele 300mm f/2.8 (1985)
  • Tamron SP LD (IF) 300mm f/2.8 (60H) (1984)
  • ARSAT MC Yashma-4H 300mm f/2.8 (1990?)

For these three lenses I also have to thank foto-friend Thomas, who borrowed them to me!

5a. Minolta AF APO-Tele 300mm f/2.8 (1985)

Minolta-Apo_300f2,8_DSCF2460_blog
Fig. 15: Minolta AF APO-Tele 300mm f/2.8 – source: fotosaurier

This lens had a mechanical defect: the diaphragm could not be closed below f/5,6. However: in these lenses principally mainly the open aperture is really significant – why should you carry around such a weight, to make pictures with f/11?

Minolta-AF-Apo-Spreadsheet
Fig. 16: Optical properties of Minolta AF 300mm f/2.8 Apo – source: fotosaurier

Minolta-AF-Apo-Graph
Fig. 17: IMATEST-Resolution (LP/PH) of Minolta AF 300mm f/2.8 Apo – center – part way and corners – source: fotosaurier

This Minolta lens comes closer to the Canon-legend than any of the others – but with quite some distance in resolution in the corners open aperture.

Excelent lens!

5b. Tamron SP LD (IF) 300mm f/2.8 (60B) (1984-1992):

Tamron-SP_300f2,8_DSCF2475_blog
Fig. 18: Tamron SP LD (IF) 300mm f/2.8 (60B) – source – fotosaurier

This is the shortest and lightest lens of the quintuple, which arrived even one year before the Minolta – containing two low-dispersion (LD) lenses – with manual focusing:

Tamron-SP_300f2,8_Spreadsheet
Fig. 19: Optical properties of Tamron SP 300mm f/2.8 LD (IF) 60B – source: fotosaurier

Tamron-SP_300f2,8_Graph
Fig. 20: Imatest resolution graphs of Tamron SP 300mm f/2.8 LD (IF) 60B – source: fotosaurier

Tamron – third party winner: Great Lens!

5c. ARSAT MC Yashma-4H (1990?):

Yashma_300f2,8_DSCF2478_blog
Fig 21: ARSAT MC Yashma-4H – source: fotosaurier

I do not know much about this lens. Funny about it is to me, that in most cases, when it is offered as a used lens, it is given the addendum „sovjet lens„! In 1990, when it was delivered first (I saw other sources with the date 2007 …) the Sovjet Union no longer existed – which means that, ARSAT being located in KIEW, the lens has UKRAINIAN roots.

As far as I know, it was generally produced in Nikon-mount.

ARSAT_Yashma_300f2,8_Spreadsheet
Fig. 22: Optical performance of Arsat MC Yashma-4H 300mm f/2.8 – source: fotosaurier

ARSAT_Yashma_300f2,8_Graph
Fig. 23: Resolution graphs of ARSAT MC Yashma 300mm f/2.8 – source: fotosaurier

Open aperture and stopped down the lens is convincing in the center – about 10-15% below the other superteles – but with still very good CA in the center.

From f/4.0 it is also very good in the large part of the frame – just 10% below the Topcor.

In the corners it is on par with the Topcor open aperture – but it does not improve so much while stopping down. For analog film use it was also a good lens – with exception of the softer corners with typical CA-values of non-apochromatic lenses … and a much higher distortion than all the other superteles.

What about apochromatic correction in supertele-lenses?

Lenses of 300mm f/2.8 need apochromatic correction to be really sharp. The chromatic aberrations („secondary spectrum“) are the major restictions in sharpnes for these long focal lengths all over the frame! All these lenses, tested in this report, have apochromatic correction – in varying degrees of perfection! In the ARSAT Yashma the apo-correction is only partly successful.

Herbert Börger

fotosaurier, Berlin 13.02.2023

Literature:

1- „Topcon Story – Topcon Enigma“ by Marco Antonetto and Claudio Russo, by Nassa Watch Gallery, Collectors Camera Publishing, CH 6907 Lugano, Switzerland – 1997

2- Web site „http://www.topgabacho.jp/Topconclub/FPslr1.htm

This, the first super fast long telephoto lens produced for any camera system world wide, came to the market in 1957. This was a large and heavy lens, with a 130mm maximum diameter, a length of 412 mm and a weight of 3.3 kg. The optical design was one of 6 elements in 4 groups. The selling price, at the time, was 135,000 Yen making it the most expensive lens on the market. Special filters slide into a slot at the rear of the lens barrel and this lens was probably the first to use this method. Unlike the 135mm f2 R Topcor, this lens was listed in catalogues into the later half of the 1970s. Because of it’s large aperture it was chosen as the official lens of record for the Tokyo Olympics. An odd thing concerning this lens is that many of those remaining have been modified for the Nikon mount, while those with the original Topcon mount are very scarce. The early lens case was made of leather but later on Topcon began supplying a hard case with the TOPCON emblem promontory displayed. The R Topcor 300mm f2.8 lens still compares favorable, with regards to regards to sharpness and contrast, to modern lenses with fluorite elements. Today this lens is almost forgotten but was highly praised in former times.

3- Web site of Steven Gandy: „https://www.cameraquest.com/top30028.htm“


Fig. 24
: Mathäuskirche in Hambühl, seen from 1,2 km distance with Topcor 300f2,8  (taken at f/5,6 with Sony A7R2 at iso800) – narrow vertical crop of nearly full frame, which you see here at about 65% enlargement – „ooc“ – no post-treatment of the picture) – source: fotosaurier

Two crazy lenses of the 1950s – Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 and Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 50mm f/1.4 for 35mm Cine-Format – plus Canon Lens 50mm f/0.95 from end of 60s

A few weeks ago I was blessed, having an Angénieux 50mm f/0,95-lens and a „Biotar 50mm f/1.4″, at the same time in the same place !

An Angénieux 50mm f/0,95-lens in perfect optical quality and with aperture-mechanism  and rehoused into a perfect Sony-E-body, focusing to infinity and ready for measurement in my optical IMATEST-Lab…. this is really a „unicorn“!


Fig. 1: Ultra-rare 50mm f/0.95-lens for Cine 35 movie-format – this lens-series (10mm, 25mm and 50mm) founded Pierre Angénieux‘ high reputation in cinematic optics! – source: fotosaurier

The „Biotar 50mm f/1.4″, in great overall condition, which I even did no know about, before I saw it for the first time.

Biotar58f1,4-front_DSCF1765
Fig. 2: One of the best high-speed-lenses ever made in Jena – Biotar 50mm f/1.4 of 1955/56 for Pentaxflex AK-16 cine-camera system – professional performance for professional use! – source: fotosaurier

Photo-friend and co-nerd Thomas handed out both ultra-rare lenses to me for closer optical inspection. I am a happy man!

Fig. 3: Two very rare lenses at the same time in the same place … in my IMATEST-Lab! Sheer happiness! – Source: fotosaurier

  1. Angénieux 50mm f/0,95 (Type M1):

Thomas has proven, that it is possible to re-house the Angénieux-lens for general photographic use with infinity focus:

Fig. 4: The early super-fast Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 lens 0f 1954/55 here in a „Unikat„-version – the basic lens is directly fitted to E-Mount for Sony – source: fotosaurier

Starting in 1953 Pierre Angénieux brought out a series of lenses with f/0.95. In 1953 it was firstly the 25mm f/0.95 (which became the most famous Angénieux lens due to the use in NASA-spaceflights to the moon!) made for cine 16mm format and the 10mm f/0.95 for 8mm-cine.

A few months later he pushed out also a version for 35mm-cine: the 50mm f/0.95 – probably this was in in 1954 – originally in C-Mount. Hartmut Thiele dates this to 1955. It is important to understand, that this is not a lens made for still-photogray amateur use – but Pierre Angénieux showed here all his knowledge dedicated for professional cine-use. He went to the limits of everything, which was possible with glass-types and design- and production-methods at that time!

If you need more information on Pierre Angénieux, please look up my Blog article here!

Following my measurements on the IMATEST-target the picture-circle, that this lens covers is 37mm – so it is falling a bit short from the 43mm needed for covering the still-photo-35mm-full-format (24 x 36 mm).

DSC05014_Ang_50f0,95_0,95-foc1,4_Bildkreis
Fig. 5: Picture of IMATEST-Target through Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 at f/0.95 in the 24 x 36 mm full-frame of the Sony A7R4 – Source: fotosaurier

This test-set-up generates the following resolution-measurement results:

Fig. 6: Resolution at center/part way/corner of Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 on Sony A7R4 (60,2 MP-sensor – 9.504 x 6.336 pixels!) at standard distance full-frame (24×36) – Source: fotosaurier

In spite of the heavy darkening in the corners, the system does still generate results, but these readings are not very reproducible … these corner-readings are located clearly outside the picture-circle for this lens!

So I made a second set-up with the camera set a little bit further away from the target, so that the individual measuring areas move somewhat towards the center of the picture and do not suffer too much from the dark areas out of the picture circle of the lens.

Fig. 7: Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 moved a bit backwards from the target – measurement-areas (marked magenta rectangles) moved somewhat further towards the picture center – avoiding overlap with the dark corners – this picture is at f/8, showing a sharper limit to the dark corner-areas! – source: fotosaurier

Now the furthest measurement locations are at 82% of the full-frame picture radius, clearly inside the bright circle which this lens covers at 86% of full-frame radius!

The result is seen in the following picture:

Fig. 8: Resolution with refocussed Angénieux lens 50mm f/0.95. The corner-resolution-values are still located outside the Cine35-picture-frame!!! The „peak“ at f/4 in the corner reading is real – no error – never seen anything like this with any other lens! – source: fotosaurier.

In Chapter 4 at the end of the article I will ad thwe measuremts at cine-format for all three lenses (Super 35: 18,66mm x 24,89mm). This will give more realistic resolution-readings. The Super35 crop-mode on the A7R4 is  6.240 x 4.160 pixels.

2. Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 50mm f/1.4:

About the same time, DDR-based Carl Zeiss Jena created a high-speed lens for its own Pentaxflex AK-16 cine-camera system in Pentaflex-16 mount.

It seemed logical to follow the already successfull BIOTAR-formula and it came out around 1955 or 1956 the Biotar 50mm f/1.4:

Biotar58f1,4-2_DSCF1757
Fig. 9: Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 50mm f/1.4 for Cine-Format, arriving 1955/56 – Source: fotosaurier

Looked at with the sensor of the Sony A7R4, the picture-circle is a bit larger than with the Angénieux … there are only minimal dark corners!

Bildkreis_DSC05072_Biotar-50f1,4_1,4-just-foc
Fig. 10: Full-frame picture of IMATEST-target through Biotar 50mm f/1.4 at f/1.4 – Source: fotosaurier

Of course, we have here the same situation, that the corner-measurements are quite a bit outside the cine-picture frame of typically 16mm x 22mm:

Biotar_50f1,4_FF_Graph

Fig. 11: Biotar 50mm f/1.4 in the same frame as Angénieux seen in Fig. 7 – source: fotosaurier

I will also with this lens repeat the measurement, restricting the resolution-target to the cine-picture frame – see section 4 at the end of the article.

The results show for both lenses, that the resolution in the center is extremely high – even wide-open! Both lenses are extraordinary lenses of their time – the mid-1950s!!!

Unique: „first-in-industry“ point of view for the Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 in its extreme speed, without sacrifycing to the center resolution!

3. Canon Lens 50mm f/0.95 for rangefinder (Canon7) cameras with LTM 39mm – of 1969

As we are just talking about early historical high-speed lenses, the step to the famous CANON 50mm f/0.95 (for rangefinder) is logical. It is a step of 15 years in time – and this time the lens is really dedicated to 35mm still-photo full-format 24mm x 36mm!

Noch'nPaar_DSCF1775
Fig. 12: Angénieux 50mm f/0,95 of 1954, left, and Canon 50mm f/0.95 of 1969 / the normal still-photo-version here – Source: fotosaurier

Here is my comparable resolution-measurement with two samples of (s.n.18924 and s.n.22372) of the Canon 50mm f/0.95 on Sony A7R4 for this lens at full 24×36-format:

Crf_50f0,95_Graph
Fig. 13: Resolution-Graph of Canon 50mm f/0.95 on Sony A7R4 (60,2 MP) – Source: fotosaurier

Fig. 13a: Resolution-Graph of Canon 50mm f/0.95 on Sony A7R4 (60,2 MP) – Source: fotosaurier

To allow for the necessary rangefinder-coupling besides the huge rear lens, this lens is „cut free“ at the edge for this purpose.

Crf59f0.95_DSCF1687
Fig. 14: Cut-away at the 50f/0.95 Canon’s rear lens, to allow for the rangefinder-coupling! – source: fotosaurier

However, the 50mm f/0.95 lens was also released in a version for video cameras, with an additional engravureTV“ on the nameplate: consequently these lenses were delivered with C-mount. As these lenses do not need the rangefinder-coupling, the rear lens is not cut at the edge here.

Hopefully I wil be able to add a picture of the 50mm f/0.95 TV-lens rear section for comparison soon.

4. Finally: Resolution-Data of these Lenses, measured for the Cine Super35-format, which the Angénieux and CZJ Biotar Lenses are originally dedicated to – on all three lenses:

a) Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 – at Super35-format:

Fig. 16: Angénieux 50mm f/0.95 at Super35-frame on Sony A7R4 – absolutely phantastic for this „first-in-speed“  – source: fotosaurier

b) Biotar 50mm f/1.4 – at Super35-format:

Fig. 17: CZJ Biotar 50mm f/1.4 at Super35-frame on Sony A7R4 – absolutely phantastic for this „first-in-speed“  – source: fotosaurier

c) Canon 50mm f/0.95 – at Super35-format on Sony A7R4:

Canon lens f=50 mm f:0.95_A7R4_Super35_Graph
Fig. 18: Canon Rangefinder 50mm f/0.95 – primarily dedicated to still-photo 24×36 but also delivered as a TV-version – just a bit better than the Angenieux, but 15 years later! – source: fotosaurier

All three lenses have very low chromatic aberrations in the center but the Canon peaks out in maximum CA, Biotar and Canon are close to zero in distortion, while the Angenieux has around -1% distortion, which is still excellent for such an early, extreme lens!

5. Appendix:

Here you see all properties of the three lenses in detail – for 24×36 (full frame) and Super 35 (cine-format).

5-a1. Angenieux M1 50mm f/0.95 – FullFormat 24×36.

5-a2. Angenieux M1 50mm f/0.95 – Super35.

5-b1. Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 50mm f/1.4 – FullFormat 24×36.

Spreadsheet_Biotar-50f1,4_FF

5-b2. Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 50mm f/1.4 – Cine35.

Spreadsheet_Biotar-50f1,4_Cine35

5-c1. Canon Rangefinder 50mm f/0.95 – FullFormat 24×36.

Spreadsheet_Crf50f0,95_FF_sn18924

5-c2. Canon Rangefinder 50mm f/0.95 – Cine35.

Spreadsheet_Canon-50f0,95_Cine35

Herbert Börger

Berlin, 24.12.2022

My Crazy Lenses / Meine sehr speziellen Objektive – Focal length 24mm / Brennweite 24mm – FoV 84° – Part I

What was the real improvement in SLR-wideangle-lenses since the invention of the retrofocus principle over the last 65 years? Does my personal judgement from analog-film-days which lead to the definition of „legendary optics“ – which I kept in my lens-portefolio over that time – correlate with objective resolution-measurements? Here are my findings.

Actualisation: Im my first published version there was an error regarding the year of appearance of the Topcor 2,5cm-lens, which was communicated to me by a reader: thank you: it’s 1965 instead of 1959! But this difference does not change anything in my findings and conclusions …

1 – Introduction

24mm focal length is a real milestone in spreading the field of the view in wideangle lenses, coming down from FL 35mm over 28mm. For the SLR-camera-user this age started with the appearance of the retrofocus lenses in the 1950s. Several designers came out with this optical principle within three years – with Pierre Angénieux earning the honours of being FIRST (in time and quality – 1950, 35mm f/2.5) in this disciplin.

This is a report about SLR-lenses for 35mm-still-foto-cameras with focal lengths (FL) between 23mm and 25mm.

This is a report about a number of legendary lenses, which I happen to own or could lend from a friend  („phothograf“), most of them being milestones of optical engineering in their respective design-periods.

Drei_24er-Oldies_DSCF1838
Fig 1: three of the very first historical retrofocus-lenses with FL 24mm and 25mm – source: fotosaurier

Over the decades of my own practical use of SLR-lenses (of nearly all makers-brands!) has lead me to an understanding of the quality for normal photographic use.

This collection of test candidates does NOT claim to be a COMPLETE collection of all design legends of 24mm/25mm. There is a large gap in time with prime-lenses between 1984 and 2015. That means: the legendary first historical aspherical lenses in this range are missing in the comparison. If I ever will be able to get hold of them for a test, I would update this article. The modern lenses tested for comparison are (of course) all aspherical types!

In spite of the fact, that important legendary lenses of the 1980s and 90s are missing here, this report allows to draw some interesting conclusions about important steps in optical lens-engineering, which finally lead to Ultra-Wideangel-Lenses which have uniform resolution and contrast over the complete field of view (FoV).

I have always looked for a method to show the quantitative progress in optical quality of photographic lenses over the nearly last 100 years – and I think I have found a good way to understand this progress with my new comparison-charts (Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 see below). What was surprising: the progress over time is independent of the lens-maker and brand. It is generated by a sequence of milestone-like innovations by singular design-legends, innovative calculation progress, creation of new glass-formulations and finally the lens-making-process – espacially allowing for the production of aspherical lens-surfaces! Once the innovation-step is basically made, it is spreading around the globe very quickly (typically within one or two years!).

There are few lenses, which stand out of the general quality-development curve, reaching a higher level of resolution earlier than most others – to be seen here mostly in Fig. 5:

ATTENTION: These measurements are made with USED lenses today, some of which are more than 60 years old! There are influences from ageing and wear (even abuse …) which have become part of the lens-properties when we measure them after long time. However, I only make measurements with samples of lenses, if the optics are clear and undamaged and the mechanics do not show excessive wear or abuse.

Vier_24+25er
Fig. 2: Starting with big-big negative front-meniscus-lenses (at left Angenieux Retrofocus 24mm f/3.5 and Zeiss Jena Flektogon 25mm f/4) the lens-designers soon learnt to reduce the front-lens diameter (at right: Distagon 25mm f/2.8 for Contarex and Olympus OM 24mm f/2,0), creating better results and generating lens-bodies, which were more acceptable  – source: fotosaurier

2 – Data section for 15 historical 24/25mm-prime lenses, 3 modern 23/25mm prime lenses and 4 modern zooms at 24mm-setting:

Auflösung ETC 23-25mm korr

Out of this Chart I have filtered two separate charts, showing the development of RESOLUTION over the decades.

Fig. 4 shows the center-resolution open aperture (blue) and stopped down to the aperture with the highest resolution (green) in the center:

23-25mm_Resol_Center_korr

23-25mm_Diagram_Center_korr

The second chart is showing the corner-resolution at open aperture (blue) vs. the best resolution-value stopped down (green) in the corners (mean value over all four corners) – where „corner“ means a value of 88% – 92% of the full picture circle of the lens which is 21.5 mm radius:

23-25mm Resol_Corners_korr

23-25mm_Diagramm_Corners_korr
Fig. 5: Corner Resolution-values  of 21 Lenses at FL 23-25mm at open aperture (blue) and optimum aperture (green, which means: the aperture at which the weighted mean of all the 46 measurement-places over the 24x36mm-frame is maximum. (The maximum corner resulution-value of the individual lens may be higher.) – source: fotosaurier

You see, that nearly all of the difference in resolution of historical top-notch wideangle-lenses for SLR is in the corners of the picture (and of course also continuously in-between center to corner areas). This is easy to understand, because the difficulties for lens-correction rise dramatically with the FoV, which is here 84 degrees corner to corner diagonally.

Besides the resolution, there are other important properties, which improved dramatically over these six decades of lens-engineering history:

a – Chromatic aberration (CA in pixel): It is very low in all these lenses in the center. It typically ranged between 4 and 8 pixels in the corners for the very first lenses of this type. It stayed around 2-3 over the time before aspherical lens-surfaces could practically erase it. Today with the best modern lenses, the value is close to zero (under 0.5) without camera correction and zero with correction.

Among the early lenses the Zeiss Distagon 25mm f/2.8 (though not really outstanding in resolution compared to the other early lenses) pops out, because it had already values of 2-2.5 pixel in the corners – together with the „unicorn“ Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5.

Please consider, that the CA-value in pixel for the same lens is the higher the smaller the pixel size of the sensor is  – here 1 pixel is 3.77 µm.

b – Linear distortion (%): distortion shows – from the beginning – the biggest differences between the legendary lenses of the different designers and brands. The designer has to do a compromise-job in each lens, balancing out the design between resolution, chromatic aberrations and distortions. 0,5 pixel is a very good CA-value even acceptable for acrchitectural work (though „zero“ would be better, of course), 0,75-1,0 pixel is a good compromise-value and 1.5 pixel just acceptable for alround use.

Looking at the spread-sheet Fig. 3, it is surprising, that Angénieux with the very first retrofocus-lens of this wide angle decided to go for nearly „ZERO“ distortion in his design! He had gone close to zero in the 35mm and 28mm-designs before that, too! Probably he wanted to give a statement of his art, because this was really difficult at that time … At the same time he accepted a somewhat higher CA of 7-8 pixels (corresponding to 0.03-0.04 mm). In my collection of top-notch lenses such a low distortion does not appear again before the modern Zeiss Batis Distagon 25mm f/2.0 – and only the legendary 1971 Minolta MD 24mm f/2.8 (including the VFC-Version) came very close with ca. 0.18-0.29% distortion in my measurements.

c – The close-focusing system: there are further innovations to consider, e.g. the lens-design for close focusing. Here one of the important innovations is the floating-element close focusing system – introduced 1971 by Nikon and Minolta first for wideangle lenses as far as I know. This is one of the early merits of the two 1971/75 24mm-Minolta-lenses.

3 – Conclusions:

3.1 Center-resolution:

Since the early days of geometrical optic lens-design with Petzval, Abbe and Seidel, lenses could be designed absolutely perfect for nearly unlimited image-quality (resolution and CA) „on-axis“, which means: in the center of the picture-field … And the  famous designers did it all the time – as soon as they used 4 or more elements in a photographic lens-system.

The first time, I found a proof for that, was with my resolution-measurements on Bertele’s first Ernostar 100mm f/2.0 from 1923 (a four-element-design WITHOUT COATING!). Compared to the legendary Leitz Apo-Macro-Elmarit 100mm f/2.8 from 1987, this lens achieved 98% of the resolution in the center – but only in the center! See my Ernostar-Bog-Article here. (This was the very first report in my photo-blog …)

So, it is not really surprising, what Fig. 4 is telling us: all top-notch lenses show a very high resolution level in the image center since the invention of the retrofocus wideangle design in the 1950s – and they are all on the about same level – though being historical lenses with up to 65 years of age on their back! The reason for that result is, of couse, that only legendary lenses of all brands are taken into the comparison! Maybe the Takumar-lens happens to be one of the weaker examples …

The Olympus OM 24mm f/3.5 „shift“ drops down somewhat against its neighbours. That is no quality issue: this lens has an image-circle diameter of 57mm for up to 10 mm shift! It came out 1984 long before Canon brought out its famous tilt-shift-lenses … Look at the corner-resolution result of this lens in Fig. 5 – it resolves extremely even over its FoV!

in this graph I marked two horizontal lines: one for the resolution of 2.000 LP/PH (linepairs per picture height), corresponding to the resolution of a 24 MP-sensor, which today is the de-facto-standard for  modern digicams. It normally has 4.000 by 6.000  pixels – and 4.000 pixels in the picture height, corresponding to 2.000 Linepairs. At the same time it is just (+15%) above the 21 MP which I estimate for the resolution of modern analogue (general purpose) film emulsions.

The other (upper) horizontal line marks the 3.184 LP/PH Nyquist-frequency of the Sensor in the Sony A7R4-digicam. This is physically the limiting resolution-value for the camera itself. Today, however, the software-algorithms in the camaras can generate structures in the picture, which are typically 15 – 20% higher in resolution, compared to the Nyquist-frequency. And they do this without creating an artificially looking „oversharpened“ picture! Good job!

This means:

All the legendary historical 24/25mm-retrofocus-lenses for SLR-cameras do out-resolve the modern 24 MP-Digicams in the center – mostly even with open aperture! And many of these lenses even come very close to (or exceed) the Nyquist-Frequency of my 60,2 MP digital camera.

Among the historical lenses two examples peek out a little bit (they peek out much more in the graph for the corner-resolution!):

The legendary 1965 Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5 exceeds the Nyquist-frequency of 3.184 LP/PH – and stopped down to f11 it is in the center the highest resolving of my 24/25mm-lenses until today. Together with the tremendous result of its corner-resolution it is one of the exceptional lenses, which I call my „UNICORNS„. Until today, I have not found any explanation for the astonishing early level of performance of this lens – how could that have been achieved? (15 years before the next-best Olympus-lens!) – and who did it? – and where did this person go afterwards, when Topcons innovative power faded out, to bring in her/his inginuity? (… to Olympus?). (This observation refers to other early Topcor-lenses al well!)

The other unicorn peeking out here is the Olympus OM 24 mm f/2.0 of 1973. In my lens-collection it is exceeded only by the 40 years younger Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2.0. But, to be honest, the difference is not really that dramatical – considering the four decades …

Referring to the zoom-lenses (set at FL 24mm) in this test: I just was curious, where the modern zooms would stand in such a comparison. We learn that the 1kg-Monster-Tokina 24-70mm zoom at 24mm has one of the best results – even at f/2.8 … in the center of the picture.

At the end of the line-up of 21 lenses I put the Fujinon-Zoom 32-64mm f/4 at 32 mm on the Fujifilm GFX100 (33x44mm – 102 MP), which corresponds to FL 26mm on „full-frame 35mm“. This shows, that for an essentially higher resolution in the picture-center, we today have to go to a larger sensor-format.

3.2 Corner-resolution:

Fig. 5 contains the important informations of this comparison-test. It shows, that step by step all the improvements in innovative design, glass-formulations and aspherical surface-generation were needed to bring finally the corner-resolution of the picture up on par with the center resolution at 24mm focal length, which is possible today – but only with the use of aspherical lens-elements!

In the graph for the corner-resolution I have added a third horizontal line, which marks the resolution at 50 Lines/mm – corresponding to 600 LP/PH. This is needed to judge the corner-resolution of the early historical lenses.

In the 1960s a wideangle-lens was rated „very good“, when it achieved a resolution of 40 Lines/mm (Modern Photography and others). I have written an article about this already here (in German).  Open aperture most super-wideangle-lense started open aperture in the range of 26 to 32 L/mm in the 1950s and 60s. Stopped down practically all the tested historical lenses surpassed the 40 L/mm-limit.

From 1958 on (ENNA) the stop-down corner-resolution rises continualy (with the exception of the two „unicorns“, already identified in Fig.4) until end of the 1970s,  it arrives close to the 2.000 LP/PH-level, which means: from now on the top-notch-lenses out-perform standard analogue fine-grain film (1977 Nikkor and 1984 Olympus). This last step was then achieved by the use of extraordinary dispersion glass-types.

The two „unicorns“ in this test arrive much earlier at this level: the Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5 out-performs analogue film already in 1959 and the 1973 Olympus OM 24mm f/2.0 exceeds this and comes close to todays modern aspherical lenses.

The modern aspherical prime-lenses are represented in my test by two very different samples:

There is the 23mm f/4 Fujinon, which originally is a GFX-lens – but in this test it is measured in the 24x36mm-Mode also with 60.2 MP on the GFX100, achieving the state of the art for 24x36mm lenses (Batis and Sigma-i) as a middle-format lens!

Just as I made my measurements for this test, the SIGMA i-Series 24mm f/3.5 arrived as a representative of a new thinking: no „impressive“ technical data   – but (hopefully) impressive preformance instead. The result shows: it achieves reference status on a 60.2 MP-sensor with corner-resolution at 85-95% of center-resolution, plus zero-distortion, zero-CA and very close focussing!

Also great news: modern zooms like the Sigma G 12-24mm f/4 – measured at 24mm – arrive now at this level of prime-lenses also in the corners!

As I had no samples of the early historical aspherical lenses in this test, we can not see, in which steps the aspherical lens surfaces moved the wideangle-performance in the picture-corners to the present level.

Maybe this gap can be filled out in some future times.

NOTE 1 – All resolution-values, which are published in this article, refer to MTF30 – what means: the point on the MTF-curve (see Fig. 7), which hits the 30% contrast value.

NOTE 2 – in Part II of this Article I will share some more informations about each individual lens (including pictures, MTF-curves and  lens-schemes).

Appendix: Method of measurement and definition of results

I use the set-up and software by IMATEST with the original IMATEST-Target. I use the large SFRplus-Setup-Image with a physical hight of 783mm bar-to-bar vertically. The distance from target to lens-flange is 0,97 meters. In this area 46 targets are analysed and I share MFT30-weighted-mean-resolution-values (all-over, center and corner), edge-sharpness, linear distortion and maximum lateral CA-values.

Resolution-values are given in Line-Pairs per Picture Height (LP/PH) – where the picture-height is always 24mm. Edge-sharpness is given in pixels (width 3,77 µm).

#TestChart_Angén90f2,5_f2,5
Fig. 6: IMATEST test-target 783mm-bar-to-bar distance. Resolution is NOT measured in the small concentric targets, but at the outside-edges of the black boxes, which are tilted b ca. 5 degrees – source: fotosaurier.

For the measurement I used a SONY A7Rm4 with 60,2 MP-resolution which has a pixel-width of 3,77 µm. The theoretical resolution-limit of the sensor is 3.184 LP/PH (Nyquist Frequency).

The camera setting is used basic as delivered from factory at ISO100 and exposure-compensation of -0.7 stops, using out-of-camera JPEGs. All measurements are made with the identical camera-body (which is important for a precise comparison: I have used one other (earlier) body of this model in comparison, which gave resolution-values between 50 and 200 LP/PH lower than my own camera-body). The repeatability with this method I estimate at 2-2.5%, using ALWAYS manual focusing on the lens with maximum focusing enlargement (11.9-fold) in the camera-viewing-system. Measurement is repeated with re-focusing until a stable maximum resolution at open-aperture of the lens is found and then pictures of the resolution-target are taken with the focussing made wide open for all full down-stops of each lens.

Edge profile (edge-sharpness) is the width of the rise from 10% to 90% intensity at a dark-bright edge in the test target – measured in pixel (width 3,77 with the camera used) – Example shown here for the latest 24mm-prime-lens SIGMA i-Series 24mm f/3,5 – at open aperture f/3,5:

Edge+MFT_Sigma24f3,5
Fig. 7: Edge-profile (top) and MTF-curve (bottom) from the IMATEST software – here the perfect graphs for the brand new Sigma 24mm f/3.5 – at open aperture. I will publish these Curves for all the lenses in PART II of this article – source: fotosaurier

Cromatic Aberration (lateral in the picture-plane) is also measured in pixel separate for red against green and blue against green over the full picture field – in the spread-sheet I note the maximum value, which is in most cases for blue and for most historical lenses in the corners of the picture – sometimes however in the intermediate area.

For more details of testing read my special blog-Article here.

Copyright: Herbert Börger

Berlin, March/April 2021

Sternstunden der Foto-Optik – Pierre Angénieux

Ein bemerkenswerter Ingenieur und Unternehmer der französischen Optik-Industrie – in Deutschland (zu) wenig bekannt.

Aktualisierung am 22.11.22: Genaue Informationen zum Objektiv „Type M1, 50 mm f/095“ in diesem Artikel unten im Text.

Aktualisierung am 15.02.23: IMATEST-Messergebnisse für das Angénieux M1 50mm f/0,95 in einem neuen Blog-Beitrag – hier.

Bei einem Gespräch auf der Photokina 2018 stellte ich fest, dass selbst altgediente Foto-Experten bei uns mit dem Namen Angénieux wenig anzufangen wissen. Das hat mich motiviert, diesen Text über die phänomenalen Innovationen von Pierre Angénieux zu verfassen, der nach dem 2. Weltkrieg die wohl nachhaltigsten (Linsen-)Erfindungen für die heutige Foto- und Film-Optik hervorbrachte:

Binnen nur 6 Jahren schenkte er der Welt drei bedeutende Innovationen:

  1. Das erste Retrofokus-Weitwinkelobjektiv für SLR-Kameras (1950)
  2. Das erste Objektiv mit Lichtstärke 1:0.95 (1953)
  3. Das erste mechanisch kompensierte „echte“ Zoomobjektiv (1956)
Pierre Angénieux

Alle diese Innovationen waren, wie gesagt, auch noch außerordentlich nachhaltig: sie sind bis heute gültiger Bestandteil aktueller optischer Konstruktionen! Heute werden alle Zooms aller Hersteller nach dem seinerzeit von Angénieux durchgesetzten System (der mechanischen  Kompensation) hergestellt. Diese Nachhaltigkeit gilt auch für die 1935 von P.A. gegründete Firma – sie existiert bis heute (Thales-Angénieux)  und ist nach wie vor ein Leuchtturm in der Film-Branche, wenn auch die Foto-Objektive in den 1990er Jahren (ca. ab 1993) an der Schwelle des Übergangs der Kleinbild-Kamerasysteme zum Autofokus-System aufgegeben wurden – wohl zeitgleich mit der Übernahme der Firma durch den Thales-Konzern.

Ein Lebensweg, gesäumt von Innovationen und nachhaltigem Erfolg.

Dass Angénieux insbesondere von 1950 bis 1964 ein solches „Feuerwerk“ von mehreren innovativen Produktlinien als doch relativ kleiner Mittelständler parallel zueinander „abbrennen“ konnte, lag daran, dass er die Zeit des 2. Weltkrieges, als seine Firma auf militärische Produkte beschränkt war, klug für grundlegende Entwicklungen in der Optik-Berechnung nutzte und vermutlich ja auch Prototypen baute, diese aber geheim hielt: mit seinen eigenen neuen Berechnungsmethoden konnte er optische Systeme 10-fach schneller berechnen als es dem damaligen Stand der Technik entsprach – noch vor dem Einsatz von Computern! Angénieux war nämlich auch als Mathematiker begabt – und mehr noch: in vielen Fällen vertraute er seinem Gespür für die Sache – und hatte sehr of das RICHTIGE Gespür.

In vielen Quellen über Angénieux wird die Zusammenarbeit mit der NASA ab 1964 als weiteres (4.) Highlight in seiner Laufbahn aufgeführt. (Optiken waren in den Ranger 7- bis Apollo 11-Missionen (1969) zum Mond eingesetzt – später begleiteten Angénieux-Objektive auf Filmkameras jede Space Shuttle Mission bis 2011! ). Das ergab sich wohl aus seiner damaligen Innovationsführer-Rolle, führte aber meines Wissens nicht zur Schaffung spezieller Optik-Systeme für diesen Zweck (abgesehen davon, dass Objektive im Weltraum mit speziellen Fetten und Coating-Systemen produziert werden mussten, wenn sie im Vakuum funktionieren sollten, oder mechanisch für den Einsatz in der Schwerelosigkeit modifiziert werden mussten.). Immerhin aber: jedesmal, wenn jemand den ersten Schritt eines Menschen auf dem Mond sieht …. blickt er quasi durch ein Angenieux-Objektiv auf diese Szene. Ein äußerst prestigeträchtiger Umstand, der sich in diesem Jahr (2019) gerade zum 50sten mal jährt!

Die primären Anwendungsbereiche, die Angénieux seinerzeit im Auge hatte, waren Cine-Objekive: für Filmkameras für die professionellen 16 mm und 35 mm-Formate – aber auch für 8 mm, Super8 und TV. Stets wurden aber auch zeitnah Objektive für Fotokameras (Kleinbild-Format) gerechnet und auch in Massen produziert. (Für die, die es nicht wissen: das 35 mm-Cine-Format hat ein deutlich kleineres Bildformat (16 mm x 22 mm – also etwa wie APS-C heute) als das (angelsächsisch) auch mit „35 mm“ bezeichnete Kleinbild-Format 24 mm x 36 mm.).

Die großen Verdienste für die optischen Systeme an Filmkameras fanden denn auch große Anerkennung in der Branche: P. Angénieux erhielt zwei „Acamedy Awards“ (vulgo: „Oscar“ genannt): Den ersten Oscar für das erste 10-fach Zoom 1964, den zweiten für sein Lebenswerk 1990. (Wer in der Award-Liste der Academy im Internet nachsehen will: dort steht er bei den Verleihungen des Jahres 1965…)

Versetzen wir uns in das Jahr 1945 (mein Geburtsjahr!): ein nun schon nicht mehr ganz so junger Optik-Ingenieur und Unternehmer (*1907) sitzt in seinem Heimatort Saint-Héand (südlich von Lion) und wartet nach dem Ende des Krieges auf seine Chance. Seine Ausbildung hat er beim französischen „Papst“ für Film-Optik – Henri Chrétien (Designer des Cinemascope-Systems) – genossen und dann von 1930 – 1935 bei dem Weltmarktführer für optisches Film-Equipment – Pathé – als Optik-Ingenieur wertvolle Erfahrungen – und vor allem Kontakte mit der filmschaffenden Industrie erworben. Nebenbei war er schon seit 1932 zeitweise selbständig tätig (A.S.I.O.M.).

Eine seiner sehr wenigen Zitate über sich selbst lautete: „Ich habe niemals für einen Chef gearbeitet.“ Er selbst mochte es nicht, wenn man über ihn sprach. Folglich äußerte es sich sehr selten öffentlich. Es gibt daher fast keine „Primär-Quellen“ über sein Werk. Er war ein Mensch, der seiner selbst sicher war – diskret, aber nicht bescheiden. Er hatte ein Gespür für die Märkte von Morgen – oft lange vor anderen – und dabei einen Sinn für den Moment, in dem es opportun ist, Produkte zu lancieren. Ein anderes der sehr seltenen Zitate aus seinem Munde:

„Ich hatte ein außergewöhnliches Leben – ich habe immer getan, was ich liebte – und es ist mir alles gelungen!“

Nachdem er die Firma in andere Hände gelegt hatte und sich zurückzog, hat er nicht etwa seine Autobiografie verfasst – sondern einen Roman geschrieben.

Er war eher nicht der Tüftler-Erfinder, der in seiner Kammer (oder dem Elfenbeinturm) etwas erdenkt und dann hervortritt, um die Welt damit zu beglücken. Zwar nutzte er die ansonsten für zivile Innovationen verlorene Zeit des 2. Weltkrieges, um in St. Héand ganz für sich bahnbrechende optische Ideen „im stillen Kämmerlein“ voranzutreiben, aber da hatte er längst mit wichtigen Filmschaffenden eng zusammengearbeitet. Ab 1930 war er ja bei Pathé mit der Crême de la Crême der französischen Filmbranche in Kontakt gewesen und wusste direkt von den Kreativen – Kameraleuten und Regisseuren – was die haben wollten, was die sich von der Technik wünschten. Und die Regisseure trafen auf jemanden, der sie verstand und das Potential hatte, ihre Vorstellungen zu realisieren – ohne auf die Interessen eines Konzerns Rücksicht nehmen zu müssen.

D.h. Angénieux startete mit dem Wissen und Verstehen der Markt-Bedürfnisse. Es wird berichtet, dass schon seine erstes Retrofocus-Weitwinkel-Objektive für 16 mm- und 35 mm-Film (10 mm f1.8/ 18,5 mm f2.2) in der Branche große Begeisterung auslösten, weil sie den Regisseuren völlig neue Blickperspektiven ermöglichte. Orson Welles hat damals umgehend mehrere Filme mit nur (oder überwiegend) diesem einen Objektiv auf der Kamera gedreht. Ähnliche Berichte gibt es über das ultralichtstarke 10 mm f0.95. Man kann wohl ohne Übertreibung sagen, das die optischen Innovationen Angénieux’ in der Entwicklung des „Looks“ des neuen französischen Films kurz nach dem 2. Weltkrieg (New Wave und Cinéma Vérité) einen bedeutenden Anteil hatten. Das geht eindeutig aus vielen Aussagen der damals führenden Kameramänner hervor und dies hat in der Folge den Ruf der Produkte des Unternehmens bei den Fachleuten weltweit gefördert!

Angénieux’ Innovations-Drang machte dabei nicht Halt bei dem Objektiv-Linsenschema im engeren Sinne. Er hatte auch immer die ganze Kamera und die Arbeitsweise der Nutzer im Blick: so integrierte er schon in das erste 10-fach-Zoom für 16mm-Filmkameras (12-120 mm f2.2) in den Objektiv-Strahlengang einen Strahlenteiler, an dem seitlich ein Sucher-Strahlengang „ausgeschleust“ war. So wurde durch Wegfall des großen und voluminösen Suchers an der Kamera selbst das ganze Gerät leichter, kompakter, präziser und bedienungsfreundlicher.  Macht man dem Kameramann die Arbeit mit der Ausrüstung leichter, wird er diese lieben, denn er kann sich auf das Wesentliche besser und schneller konzentrieren! Vermutlich waren es genau diese „gesamtheitlichen“ Sichtweise des Ingenieurs Angénieux, die den schnellen und großen Erfolg beförderten.

Daraus darf man nicht schließen, dass Angénieux die Foto-Optik stiefmütterlich behandelt hätte: schon als die ALPA Reflex 1939 als zweite SLR nach der Kine Exakta auf den Markt kam, war sie mit Normalobjektiven  50 mm f2.9 oder 50 mm f1.8 von P.Angénieux ausgestattet. Dutzende  Consumer-Kameras von 6 x 9 cm bis Kleinbild wurden in großen Mengen mit Angénieux-Optiken ausgestattet – besonders auch bei Kodak-Pathé.

Auch der Lebensabend dieses ungewöhnlichen Menschen verlief anders als man es von solchen unternehmerischen Lichtgestalten gewöhnt ist: Er klammerte sich nicht bis an das Lebensende an sein „Baby“, sondern gab, nachdem er alles erreicht hatte auf dem Höhepunkt des Erfolges seiner Zoom-Objektive mit 67 Jahren im Jahr 1974 die Leitung der Firma an Schwiegersohn und Sohn ab. Im Ruhestand schrieb er sogar einen Roman. Die Firma wurde 1993 schließlich – nach einem kurzen Intermezzo mit Essilor als Mehrheitseigner – an den Thales-Konzern verkauft und existiert bis heute erfolgreich als Thales-Angénieux. Pierre Angénieux starb 1998 mit 90 Jahren.

Am Ende des Textes habe ich eine Übersichtstabelle über die wichtigsten Innovations-Schritte durch Angénieux angefügt. Darin sind weitere Innovationen in Militär- und Medizin-Technik noch gar nicht berücksichtigt (erstes Head-up-Display, Schattelose OP-Kaltlichtquellen etc.).

Ich möchte noch erwähnen, dass es eine zweite sehr wichtige Persönlichkeit im Hause Angénieux gab, der sicher erheblicher Anteil an der Erfolgsgeschichte zu kommt: André Masson (*1921), der 1951 in die Firma eintrat und ebenso ein äußerst fähiger Optik-Ingenieur war. Er hatte zuvor in der Forschung am Konzept der MTF (Modulationstransferfunktion zur qualitativen Beurteilung von komplexen Linsensystemen) gearbeitet und dies in Frankreich parallel zu den Zeiss-Koryphäen Hansen und Kinder (1943) entwickelt. Dieses System bildete dort genau wie bei Zeiss die Grundlage der optischen Qualität. Die Foto-Zooms, die ich besitze, wurden mit einem MTF-Diagramm ausgeliefert in das der Messwert dieses Objektivs bei  20 L/mm von Hand eingetragen ist – in allen Fällen liegt dieser Punkt deutlich über der angegebenen „mittleren“ MTF-Kurve.

André Masson war dann später bis zu seinem Ruhestand 1991 Generaldirektor bei Angénieux.

Ich erlaube mir an dieser Stelle noch einige tiefere Bemerkungen zu diesem „Phänomen Angénieux“, wie es sich nach intensivem Studium mir heute darstellt: ich habe zuvor bereits den Begriff „Nachhaltigkeit“ mit einer Vielzahl seiner Erfindungen in Verbindung gebracht. Wir haben es offensichtlich mit einem Ideal- und Glücks-Fall eines Mathematiker-Ingenieur-Marktversteher-Unternehmers zu tun, der oft das WESENTLICHE sah und dies dann auch aufgrund seiner Talente leisten und umsetzen konnte. Umgekehrt bedeutete dies, dass er – zumindest in der Anfangszeit – nicht immense Mengen Zeit und Geld in die Vermarktung der Produkte stecken musste – vielmehr riß man ihm seine Produkte bereits im Prototyp-Stadium aus den Händen! Regisseurinnen und Regisseure drehten mehrfach bereits Filme mit Objektiv-Prototypen, ehe die Objektive offiziell in die Produktion gegangen waren – und wirkten damit auch an der Erprobung der Produkte mit, die dann vor der Aufnahme der Serienproduktion noch angepasst werden konnten. Kann man sich eine privilegiertere Position vorstellen? Man kann auch seine Begeisterung für den Film gut verstehen: diese Welt bot Glamour… dem er sich selbst als Person allerdings konsequent entzog.

Meine persönlichen Erfahrungen mit Angénieux-Optiken.

Mit dem oben beschriebenen Wissen bin ich nicht auf die Welt gekommen. Als sich bei mir die Liebe zu Fotografie und Optik in den 60er Jahren zunehmend manifestierte, hatte Pierre Angénieux persönlich sein Lebenswerk schon fast vollendet… Geprägt durch die sehr frühen Erfahrungen mit der Contaflex II meines Vaters und die Liebe zur Natur- und Makro-Fotografie, ergab sich fast zwangsläufig meine Orientierung zur Spiegelreflex-Technik, die in der ersten Station natürlich bei EXAKTA (Varex IIb) münden musste. Schon damals hätte ich durchaus Angénieux-Objektive an meiner Exakta verwenden können – sie hatten damals einen Ruf wie Donnerhall… da ich mir aber als Student nicht einmal die hervorragenden original Zeiss-Jena-Boliden leisten konnte, war ich durchaus glücklich mit meinen Enna- und Isco-Linsen (das nannte man damals noch nicht „third-party-lenses“ sondern einfach „Fremdhersteller-Objektive“).

Praktischer Zugang zu den Meisterstücken des P. Angénieux ergab sich für mich erstmals zufällig im Jahr 2004. Ich experimentierte damals viel mit grandiosen älteren Analog-Objektiven aus den Baureihen Leica R, (Zeiss) Contax C/Y, Olympus OM und hatte alle nötigen Adapter für die Canon EOS 10d (und konnte Nikon-Optiken auch an der Kodak DCS Pro 14n mit 14 MP verwenden). Damals lieh mir ein Foto-Freund sein Angénieux-Zoom 45-90 mm f2.8, das mechanisch schon sehr stark abgenutzt war (zu diesem Zeitpunkt ja auch schon 22-33 Jahre alt….).

Schon der Blick durch den Sucher war eine Überraschung für mich, als ich sofort den hohen Kontrast des Sucherbildes wahrnahm. Die damit gemachten Aufnahmen bestätigten diesen Eindruck dann in vollem Umfang.

Angénieux-Optiken für Foto-Anwendungen.

Angénieux 45-90mm f2,8

Bild 1: Das erste Angénieux Foto-Zoom 45-90 f2.8 für Leicaflex 1968-1980 exklusiv für Leica in Leica-Design (Leica-Ref. 11930) – hier an der Leica R8

Angénieux-Festbrennweiten

Bild 2: Meine Angénieux Festbrennweiten (alle für ALPA) v.l.n.r.: 28 mm f3.5 (1953), 24 mm f3.5 (1957), 90 mm f2.5, 180 mm f4.5 – rechts das 90er-Jahre-APO-Tele 180 mm f2.3 mit Leica R-Anschluss – inzwischen ist das Retrofocus 35mm f2.5 für Exakta hinzu gekommen …

Angénieux Foto-ZoomsBild 25.01.20 um 23.02

Bild 3: Meine Angénieux-Zoom-Objektive v.l.n.r.: 45-90 mm f2.8 (1969-1982), 35-70 mm f2.5-3.3 (1982), 70-210 mm f3.5 und 28-70 mm f2.6 AF (1990) (2.v.r. – hier für Nikon)

In diesem Blog (fotosaurier.de) werde ich die Qualität dieser Objektive im Vergleich mit zeitgenössischen und modernen Optiken anderer Hersteller näher untersuchen und vergleichen.

Das ursprüngliche „R1“ genannte erste Weitwinkel 35 mm f/2.5 hat es laut Ponts Monografie (Lit.1) für ALPA nicht gegeben …. 

Die Liste der Foto-Zoom-Objektive nimmt sich im Vergleich zu dem „Feuerwerk“ von Zoom-Modellen für den Cine-Bereich bescheiden aus. Patrice-Hervé Pont führt in seiner Monografie für 8 mm-, 16 mm- und 35 mm-Filmkameras und TV-Kameras 101 Modelle (bis zum Jahr 2002) auf – die speziellen Modifikationen (u.a. für Anamorphot-Vorsätze und die Raumfahrt) nicht mitgerechnet… Daran sieht man deutlich, welche Prioritäten die Firma – nachvollziehbar aus geschäftlichen Gründen! – setzte. Für die verschiedenen Cine- und TV-Formate gab es immerhin auch 29 Festbrennweiten, wovon eine – das Retrofocus-Objektiv „R7“ – 5,6 mm f1,8 mit 94° Bildwinkel für Cine16mm noch bis nach dem Jahr 2000 gefertigt wurde.

a – Retrofokus-Objektive:

Diesen Begriff hat Angénieux für das schon länger bekannte „reverse telephoto design“ (also „umgekehrtes Tele-Objektiv“) eingeführt. Schon Cooke Optics war bei seinen Objektiven für das Technicolor-Verfahren (ab ca. 1922) wegen des zwischen Objektiv und Film stehenden Strahlenteilers gezwungen Objektive mit im Verhältnis zur Brennweite vergrößertem filmseitigen Abstand zu schaffen – die „Panchro Lenses“. Schon 1930 hatte H.W.Lee (für Tayler, Tayler & Hobson) sein inverted telephoto design patentiert (für 50° Bildwinkel und f/2.0).

Bis zum Beginn des 2. Weltkrieges gab es erst drei serienmäßige Kleinbild-Spiegelreflex-Modelle (35mm-SLR): die Kine-Exakta (1933/34) und die Praktiflex (1936) aus Deutschland und die schweizerische ALPA Reflex (1944). Aber schon damals war der Fachwelt klar, dass das SLR-Prinzip viele grundsätzliche Vorteile gegenüber der Sucherkamera hätte – wenn nur nicht der Platzbedarf für den Schwenkspiegel zwischen Film und Objektivrückseite wäre! Diese Situation beschränkte zunächst den Einsatz von  Weitwinkelobjektiven kurzer Brennweite (<45 mm bei Kleinbild). Angénieux hatte das Erscheinen der Alpa-Reflex-Kamera mit ihrem (bis heute) kleinsten Auflagemaß aller SLR-Kameras (37,8 mm gegenüber typischerweise 44-45 mm!) noch vor der Schaffung der Retrofocus-Lösung dazu benutzt, für diese Kamera ein Objektiv 35mm f3.5 heraus zu bringen, das nicht mit dem Spiegel kollidierte -das ist  meines Wissens ein einmaliger Fall geblieben, sonst war bei 40 mm Schluss.

Die für die Sucherkameras üblichen Weitwinkel-Konstruktionen wurden daher anfangs mit hochgeklapptem Spiegel (und Aufsteck-Sucher) benutzt, da sie tief in die Kamera hineinragen mussten.. Es war also eine absolut dringende Problemstellung, Lösungen für den SLR-konstruktionsbedingten größeren Abstand bis zur Filmebene für Weitwinkelobjektive zu finden. Daher verwundert es nicht, dass dafür praktisch zeitgleich identische Lösungen erschienen – zeitlich hatte Angénieux mit seinem Patent vom 29.7.1950 allerdings die Nase vorne.

Angénieux Retrofocus-Patent 1953
Bild 4: Retrofocus-Patent P.Angénieux von 1950

Das erste Angénieux-Retrofokus-Objektiv (R1 – 35 mm f2.5) wurde zeitgleich mit dem Patent 1950 angekündigt. Ab 1953 wurde dieser Objektiv-Typ für SLR-Kameras bei Angénieux in Serie produziert – in GROSSSERIE! – 45.000 Optiken verließen jährlich das Werk, 40% davon nach USA.

Angénieux35f2,5_900

Bild 5: Erstes Retrofokus-Weitwinkel für SLR-Kameras – P.Angénieux  R1 35mm f2.5 in Fassung für Exakta

1953 wurde auch schon das 28 mm f3.5 (R11) vorgestellt und 1957 kam das 24 mm f3.5 für SLR-Fotokameras heraus.

Bereits 1951 waren das 10 mm f1.8 (R21) für das 16mm-Cine-Format und das 18 mm f2.2 (R2) für 35 mm-Cine vorgestellt – jene Optiken die schlagartig in der französischen Filmindustrie mit dem neuen Blickwinkel für Furore sorgten. Die Objektive für Filmkameras fanden dabei oft schon als Einzelstücke sofort in Filmproduktionen berühmter Regisseure Eingang, ehe überhaupt die Serienproduktion begonnen hatte.

Ehrlich gesagt, gehört das Retrofokus-Prinzip aus meiner Sicht eigentlich nicht zu den so dramatisch schwierigen Aufgaben der Foto-Technik.

Noch einmal zurück zur Aufgabe: die Schnittweite der üblichen Weitwinkel-Objektive für Messsucher-Kameras wie Leica ist zu kurz, da der Schwenkspiegel hinter dem Objektiv bei den SLR-Kameras mindestens 37 mm Schnittweite erforderte. Beim Auge würde man sagen: es ist „kurzsichtig“ – und verpasste ihm (mindestens seit dem 17. Jahrhundert) eine Zerstreuungslinse als „Brille“. Genau das ist in der „Fig.1“ des Patentes auch zu sehen: eine negative Meniskus-Linse in größerem Abstand vor einem Tessar-Grundobjektiv. Das ist eine Lösung, auf die ein Optik-Ingenieur leicht kommen kann  – oder? Bei dieser einfachsten Variante (sie reichte für ein 35 mm-Weitwinkel aus) liegt der Mittelpunkt der vorgesetzten Zerstreuungslinse genau im vorderen Brennpunkt des Grundobjektivs. Dadurch bleibt die Brennweite des Grundobjektivs erhalten, nur die Schnittweite vergrößert sich.

Ganz so einfach, wie ich den grundsätzlichen „Trick mit der Kurzsichtigkeits-Brille“ beschrieben habe, ist die Lösung allerdings bei weitem nicht – jedenfalls nicht, wenn eine sehr gute Bildqualität angestrebt wird. Durch das vorgesetzte Zerstreuungsglied wird das Objektiv nun stark unsymmetrisch, verglichen mit dem meistens ziemlich symmetrischen Grundobjektiv. Dadurch werden alle Abbildungsfehler erheblich vergrößert. Es mussten zusätzlich Korrekturglieder eingeführt werden zusätzlich zur Modifikation des Grundobjektivs selbst. In den 50er Jahren hatten daher die ersten Retrofokus-Designs meist 6-7 Linsen, je nach Lichtstärke. Anfang der 60er Jahre hatten gute Retrofokus-Weitwinkel für Kleinbild (24/25 mm, 20/21 mm) 9 oder 10 Linsen. Ohne die reflexmindernde Vergütung der Linsen wäre das zuvor praktisch gar nicht möglich gewesen! Und es brauchte für eine ausgezeichnete Korrektur und höhere Lichtstärke dann auch neuere höher brechende Glassorten, um die Aufgabe gut zu lösen.

Gleichzeitig mit Angénieux haben allerdings die Ingenieure anderer Firmen auch daran gearbeitet: von Zeiss Jena weiß man gesichert, dass 1950 bereits eine Nullserie des 35 mm f2.8 Retrofokus-Weitwinkelobjektivs „Flektogon“ existierte – auch wenn der Designer Dr. Harry Zöllner das Patent erst am 8.3.1953 angemeldet hat – etwa zum Zeitpunkt der Produktionsaufnahme, die fast zeitgleich mit Angénieux war. Ich bin ziemlich sicher, dass es sich um unabhängige Parallelentwicklungen handelte: erstens wegen des gesicherten Zeitrahmens der Flektogon-Nullserie 1950 und zweitens wegen der großen Verschiedenheit des beim Flektogon verwendeten Grundobjektivs.

Auf dem Sektor Retrofokus bestand also offensichtlich 1950-1953 noch Gleichstand zwischen Saint-Héand und Jena – deshalb will ich auch die damals beteiligten Optik-Ingenieure aus Jena hier ausdrücklich erwähnen. Die Schöpfer des Jena-Flektogon waren Dr. Harry Zöllner und Rudolf Solisch.

Zeiss West kam etwas später mit dem gleichen Konzept unter dem Markennamen „Distagon“ auf den Markt (allerdings zuerst für Hasselblad 6×6 1954 und 1956 – dann ab 1958 mit dem 35mm f4 für die Contarex). 

In diesem Zusammenhang soll eine dubiose Verschwörungstheorie nicht unerwähnt bleiben, die meines Wissens von Rudolf Kingslake in die Welt gesetzt wurde: demnach sei das Retrofokus-Prinzip ausschließlich bei Zeiss entwickelt worden – und das Know-How (ein Patent existierte vorher weder bei Zeiss in Jena noch bei Zeiss-Ikon in Stuttgart!) nach dem Krieg als „Reparations-Leistung“ an Angénieux gelangt! Ganz davon abgesehen, dass der Vorgang an sich ein absurdes Konstrukt darstellt: aus Jena, das nach dem Krieg als erste mit Retrofokus aktiv wurde, sind Reparationsleitungen sicher – wenn überhaupt – nur nach Russland gegangen. Mir erscheint es wesentlich wahrscheinlicher, dass es hier um eine „Spitze“ eines britischen Autors gegen französische Spitzenleistungen handeln könnte. (The never ending story…)

Präzise läßt sich dagegen nachverfolgen, wie kurz nach der Vorstellung des Jena-Flektogons das Retrofokus-Prinzip in Westdeutschland bei der Firma ISCO in Göttingen (24 mm f4) auftauchte: der Jenaer Miterfinder Rudolf Solisch war in den Westen gegangen und ist als einer der Erfinder des ISCO-Patentes genannt. Dieses sehr frühe 24 mm-Weitwinkel hatte allerdings bei weitem nicht die hohe optische Qualität des Angénieux-Objektivs (24 mm f3.5!) – und hier könnte man den Kreis schließen: warum sollte  jemand, der nur „Nachahmer“ eines Originals ist, auf Anhieb ein so viel besseres Produkt entwickeln können als der Besitzer des Original-Wissens?

in den 50er Jahren und bis Mitte der 60er war Angénieux‘ großer Vorsprung durch die eigene – bis zu 10-mal schnellere Berechnungsmethode ohne Computer besonders wirksam: beide Zeiss-Firmen (Ost und west) taten sich anfangs schwer mit den unsymmetrischen Konstruktionen und brauchten 2-3 Anläufe um eine wirklich gute Optik herzustellen. Währenddessen lieferte Angénieux nur einmal und dann gleich richtig gut. Die Optiken wurden in der Folge nie überarbeitet. Allerdings verlor ja ganz offensichtlich Angénieux sehr bald das Interesse an den Festbrennweiten – zugunsten der der extrem erfolgreichen Zooms. Mit der fortschreitenden Computeranwendung verlor sich dann auch bald der „Geschwindigkeitsvorteil“ aus den 1950er Jahren.

Die 20 mm-Brennweite (oder kürzer) wurde von Angénieux dann für das Foto-Kleinbild-Format nicht mehr auf den Markt gebracht – wohl aber das entsprechende Modell „R7“ (5,9 mm f1.8 – 10 Linsen) für das Cine-16mm-Format (1967). Dieses wurde als einzige Cine-Festbrennweite noch bis zum Jahr 2000 geliefert. Vermutlich hat der in den 60er Jahren von Angénieux losgetretene Boom bei den Zoom-Objektiven alle Kapazitäten absorbiert bzw. der eintretende wirtschaftliche Erfolg der hochwertigen professionellen Zoom-Produkte für Film-Kameras das Interesse am Foto-Segment in den Hintergrund treten lassen.

b – Die Lichtstärke 1:0.95 „Type M1“ (1953):

Schon in den 30er Jahren des 20. Jh. gab es das „Rennen“ um die „schnellsten“ Linsen: das Ernostar war der erste Schritt – der Doppel-Gauss-Typ die alternative Route. Es setzte sich die Weiterentwicklung des Ernostar zum „Sonnar“ (Bertele) bis f1.5 durch – einfach deswegen, weil es eine gute Lösung mit der geringsten Zahl von Glas-Luft-Flächen bot: die Vergütung war noch nicht Stand der Technik! Es gab Ansätze und Patentanmeldungen bis f1.1 (Lee-lens), 1934, oder Farron f1.2 von Tronnier oder ein Xenon f1.5 von 1932 – aber es war für normale fotografische Zwecke nicht realisierbar wegen des Streulicht-Problems ohne Vergütung. Einzig als Gauss-Typ in Serie realisiert wurde meines Wissens vor dem 2. Weltkrieg das Biotar von Carl Zeiss (75 mm f1.5) – praktisch zeitgleich mit der Einführung der Einschicht-Linsen-Vergütung ab 1936. Sonst war Sonnar der Standard. Spezial-Objektive (Doppel-Gauss) waren bereits Realität für die fotografische Aufzeichnung von Oszilloskop- oder Röntgen-Aufnahmen bei denen das Streulicht-Problem vermeidbar war: z.B. Leitz Summar 75 mm f0.85!!! Eine respektable Bildqualität war aber auch bei diesen Objektiven erst ab f1.2 zu realisieren, da einfach auch noch die geeigneten Glassorten fehlten.

Hier konnte Angénieux gleich nach dem Kriegsende seine enorme Leistungsfähigkeit bei der Optik-Berechnung ausspielen: parallel zu den ersten Retrofokus-Objektiven schuf er die erste großserienfähige Objektivserie mit Lichtstärke 1:0.95 – offensichtlich bewusst kleiner als 1.0 angesetzt, wegen des damit verbundenen  Prestige-Anspruches: Das Lichtbündel hat einen größeren Durchmesser als die Brennweite! Und das können wir beherrschen! Die Patentanmeldung ist von 1953 und die Versionen 10 mm f0.95 (für 16 mm Cine-Format) und 25 mm f0.95 (für 35 mm-Filmformat) – wurden auch sofort bei der Filmarbeit  eingesetzt: das Objektiv passte ideal zum Aufbruch des „cinéma vérité“ in Frankreich.

Angénieux M1 f0,95

Bild 6: Ultra-Lichtstarkes Objektiv Angénieux „M1“ mit f0.95

Damit konnte man gegebenenfalls sogar ohne Drehgenehmigung (mit der Handkamera) in der Metro filmen!

Das 25 mm f0.95 war dann in jenen legendären NASA-Raumfahrt-Missionen Ranger7 bis Ranger8 (ab 31.7.1964) für die TV-Bilder von der Mondoberfläche beim Sturz der Sonden auf die Mondoberfläche eingesetzt

Das Objektiv 10 mm f0.95 (entsprechend photometrisch T1.1 !) wurde in großen Stückzahlen für Bell&Howell-Filmkameras vertrieben.

Es handelte sich um ein (8-linsiges) Doppelgauss-Objektiv (s. Bild oben).

1960 kam auch das 50 mm f0.95 (M1) dazu – ich habe aber im Blog „Street Silhouettes“ den Hinweis gefunden, dass es auch eigentlich ein Cine-Objektiv sein soll, das den Kleinbild-Bildkreis nur knapp auszeichnet. Das Buch von PONT bestätigt das: es ist für Cine 35mm gerechnet. Ich besitze das Objektiv selbst nicht und habe auch keine eigenen Erfahrungen damit. Wahrscheinlich läßt es sich nur an spiegellosen Kameras bis Unendlich fokussieren.

Aktualisierung 22.11.22:

Inzwischen konnte ich es mir nun allerdings von einem technisch begnadeten Foto-Freund, einem auf Objektive spezialisierten Sammler, leihen (s. unten stehendes Bild).

IMG_8668_Blog1
Bild 7: Type M1 mit 50 mm Brennweite und Öffnungsverhältnis 1:0,95 (1960) –  von Foto-Freund „Phothograf“ aufgespürt und in eine Fokussiereinheit eingebaut – dies ist ein UNIKAT! – Source: fotosaurier

Damit war ich in der glücklichen Lage, die Bildfeldabdeckung aus erster Hand zu ermitteln und die optische Qaulität (mit IMATEST) zu messen:

Die Bildfeldabdeckung beträgt radial 86% der Kleinbild-Diagonale, das Objektiv hat also einen Bildkreis von ca. 37 mm! (s. Darstellung der Aufnahme damit am Test-Chart)

DSC05023_Ang_50f0,95_22_Bildkreis_Blog
Bild 8: Nutzbarer Bildkreis des Angénieux Typ M1 50 mm f/0.95 – Aufnahme der Meß-Test-Chart von IMATEST – Source: fotosaurier

Mit einem relativ geringen Crop-Faktor kann man mit dem Objektiv also durchaus am Vollformat-Sensor (oder Kleinbild-Analog-Film!) arbeiten.

Die von mir gemessenen optischen Leistungen des riesigen Glas-Klotzes sind nicht anders als SPEKTAKULÄR zu nennen. Inzwischen liegen die Messergebnisse für das 50er Angénieux „M1“  vor – gleichzeitig auch für das legendäre Biotar 50mm f/1.4 .

Für Kleinbild 24×36 mm wäre an einer SLR die Unendlich-Einstellung mit diesem Objektiv wohl ein Problem (außer bei der ALPA-Reflex!) – an einer spiegellosen Systemkamera ist das aber kein Thema.

Damit scheint Pierre Angénieux das Kapitel der ultra-lichtstarken Optiken hinter sich gelassen zu haben – mir sind auch für später keine weiteren hoch-lichtstarken Angénieux-Objektive bekannt.

Danach begann allerdings im internationalen Bereich das Rennen um die prestigeträchtigen hochlichtstarken Boliden für Kleinbildkameras erst richtig – zunächst noch für Meßsucherkameras: 1956 mit dem 50 mm f1.1 von Zunow und Nikon – Canon auch 1956 erst mit 50 f1.2 – und dann 1961 mit dem legendären 50 mm f0.95…mit Hilfe der Linsenvergütung nun alle mit erweiterten Doppel-Gauss-Modifikationen.

Erst in den 1970ern waren dann die Glassorten (z.B. mit anormaler Dispersion) verfügbar, um bei diesen „Lichtriesen“ wirklich gute Abbildungseigenschaften zu erreichen. Heute können sie „scharf“ bis zum Rand sein – hauptsächlich wegen des Einsatzes von asphärischen Linsen und auch immer neuer Glassorten.

c – Zoom-Objektive:

Die dritte Innovation des P.Angénieux nach weiteren drei Jahren – 1956 – war die bedeutendste und ebenso nachhaltig bis heute wirksame, wie das Retrofokus-Prinzip: das Zoom-Objektiv mit mechanischer Kompensation.

Wie die meisten Vorläufer-Entwicklungen für Objektive mit variabler Brennweite zielte auch diese primär auf cinematografische Anwendungen. Schon Ende des 19. Jh. gab es erste Ideen und Versuche mit Objektiven variabler Brennweite (Dallmeyer, USA). Allererste Anfänge lagen in Fernrohren mit variabler Vergrößerung (1880, Donders, Barlow). Die „Gummilinse“ war ja auch ein viel zu schöner Traum, um ihn NICHT zu träumen!

Erste optische Designs konnten durch Verschieben einer Linse oder Linsen-Gruppe die Brennweite variieren. Das Objektiv musste danach neu fokussiert werden. Ein kontinuierliches variieren mit konstanter Bildschärfe war nicht möglich.

1950 entwarf R.Cuvillier bei SOM Berthiot ein solches System mit optischer Kompensation, das Pan Cinor 20-60 mm f2.8 für das 16 mm Cine-Format. Diese erste professionelle Optik war weltweit sofort sehr erfolgreich (100.000 Pan Cinor in 1962 – es gab dann auch noch ein 17-85 f2). Es ist üblich, derartige Systeme als „Varifokal-Objektive“ zu bezeichnen, denn der Begriff „Zoom-Objektiv“ wurde erst später eben genau für das Angénieux’sche System geprägt. Nachdem sich Angénieux’ System durchgesetzt hatte, wurde das Pan-Cinor Anfang der 1970er Jahre eingestellt.

Angenieux hat als guter Mathematiker mit seinen Berechnungsmethoden schnell erkannt, dass das optische System des Pan Cinor auf maximal 4-faches Brennweitenverhältnis und mäßige Lichtstärken limitiert sein würde, was er für nicht ausreichend erachtete.

Er schuf ein „mechanisch kompensiertes“ Linsen-System, bei dem synchron und mechanisch exakt gesteuert, zwei Linsengruppen gleichzeitig „differentiell“ verschoben wurden: eine variiert die Brennweite („Variator“), die andere refokussiert gleichzeitig auf die konstante Fokal-Ebene („Compensator“). Auch dieses System hatte Vorläufer (Busch Vario Glaukar 25-80 und Cooke Varo 40-120 mm, alle für Cine-Anwendungen).

Bis heute beruhen alle Zoom-Objektive ausschließlich auf diesem Prinzip, das Pierre Angénieux durchgesetzt hat!

Auch hier will ich nicht unterschlagen, dass es auch Autoren gibt, die die Innovationsleistung  von Pierre Angénieux beim Zoom-Objektiv eher gering einschätzen: der britische Technik-Historiker Nick Hall sagt in seiner „Zoom Lens History“ (Zitat): „However, it would be a mistake to think that the Angénieux lenses represented a radical breakthrough: they were, instead, an incremental development, building on earlier devices (such as the Pan Cinor), and it seems unlikely that they would have caught on as quickly as they did in Hollywood had the Zoomar and Pan Cinor lenses not paved the way in film and television.“

Diese Aussage in Bezug auf das „Pan-Cinor“ ist falsch – der Rest des Satzes stimmt wohl insofern, als das Thema „ZOOM“ einfach schon lange im Raum stand – und dringend einer echten Lösung harrte – die Angénieux lieferte. Angesichts der Durchsetzung des Angénieux-Produktes und der Jahrzehntelangen technischen Überlegenheit der Angénieux-Zooms erscheint mir Hills Aussage unangemessen. Erneut eine Spitze eines britischen Autors gegen die französische Koryphäe? Ich habe noch nicht überprüft was Kingslake (den Hill sehr verehrt) zum Thema Angénieux-Zoom geschrieben hat…

Das 1956 vorgestellte und patentierte Objektiv war ein 17-68 mm T2.2 für das 16 mm Cine-Format. Es wurde ab 1958 ausgeliefert und veränderte in der Folge radikal die Bauform der Filmkameras. Schon 1961 wurde das 12-120 mm T2.2 ausgeliefert, das sofort massiv und weltweit für journalistische Arbeit, Reportage- und Dokumentations-Aufgaben eingesetzt wurde. Es wurde zum meistverkauften 16mm-Cine-Zoomobjektiv aller Zeiten.

Andere Zoom-Objektive für 16 mm-Cine-Format waren:

1963: 15-150 mm f/1.9-2.8 1964: 12-240 mm f/3.5-4.8 1965: 9.5-95 mm f/2.2 1966: 12.5-75 mm f/2.2 1967: 10-120 mm f/1.8 1967: 20-240 mm f/2.2 1971: 9.5-57 mm f/1.6-2.2 1977: 10-150 mm f/2-2.2 und 16-44 mm f/0.95-1.1

Schon 1962 folgte das 25-250 mm T3.2 für das 35 mm-Cine-Format, für das Angénieux bereits 1964 den ersten Academy-Award („Oscar“) erhielt. Es wurde in dieser Form 23 Jahre lang produziert ehe es 1985 durch das 25-250 mm f3.2-f4.0 abgelöst wurde. (Da hatte Pierre Angénieux sich bereits seit über 10 Jahren aus der Firma zurück gezogen… das, was er geschaffen hatte, war offensichtlich von Bestand – bis heute.)

Die totale Überlegenheit, die Angénieux mit diesen Zoom-Objektiven erreichte, wird durch die Tatsache verdeutlicht, dass der bedeutendste Konkurrent, Cooke, erst 1978 mit einem konkurrenzfähigen Objektiv heraus kam: dem Cooke Super Cine Varotal 25-250 mm f2.8.

Später gab es ein Rennen um die größte Zoom-Spannweite, die für TV-Kameras besonders nützlich war: hier hatte Angénieux gegenüber Berthiot stets “die Nase vorn“: 1976/77 mit 42-fach Zoom (speziell für die Olympischen Spiele in Moskau 1980 vorgesehen): 15-630 mm in einem Zoom! Dann 1994 mit 72-fach Zoom! Für militärische Zwecke (Fa. Raytheon, USA) wurden bereits zwei Exemplare eines 100x-Zooms (mit 3 Metern Baulänge!) im Jahr 1985 hergestellt!

Ein anderes, noch früheres 35mm-Zoom war das 35-140 mm T3.5, das bereits 1961 von Godard und Truffaut eingesetzt wurde, und für das sofort bei Erscheinen das Anamorphot-System („Franscope“) eines befreundeten Ingenieurs zur Verfügung stand. Später integrierte Angénieux selbst Anamorphot-Systeme in die eigenen Objektive.

Einer der bedeutendsten Kameramänner jener Tage, Willy Kurant, hat sich ausführlich über diese Konstellation geäußert (Lit.*): “I shot my first feature for Agnes Varda, The Creatures, in Black & White, Anamorphic, with a 35-140 mm Angénieux zoom converted to Franscope by the Fellous brothers and Dicop. Roger Fellous, who had worked with me as an assistant, came to my house to calibrate the lens on the camera. We used this one anamorphic lens for the entire movie. It was of excellent quality.“ An diesem Tag (30.03.2019), da ich dies hier schreibe, kam gerade die Nachricht, dass Agnes Varda mit 90 Jahren gestorben ist…

Schon längere Zeit als Sponsor auf den Filmfestspielen präsent, verleiht das Folgeunternehmen „Thales Angénieux“ jährlich seit 2013 einen Preis an Kamerafrauen und -männer: den „Pierre Angénieux ExcelLens in Cinematography Award“.

Willy Kurant hat an anderer Stelle festgestellt, dass gleich die allerersten Angénieux-Zoomobjektive  die gleiche Bildqualität wie gute Festbrennweiten lieferten. So war es konsequent, dass Angénieux die Fertigung von Festbrennweiten für Filmkameras schon bald einstellte – zumal dort ein sehr breites Angebot von Wettbewerbern existierte. Was liegt näher als sich voll und ganz auf das Gebiet zu konzentrieren, in dem man einzigartig und weltweit führend ist?

Zooms für Foto-Kameras:

Der enorme Erfolg der Cine-Zooms war sicher ein Grund dafür, dass Angénieux sich nun viel Zeit ließ, das revolutionäre neue System auch für Foto-Objektive bereit zu stellen. (Zuvor waren auch schon sehr lange keine neuen Festbrennweiten für SLR-Kameras heraus gekommen.)

Dadurch hatten andere Hersteller die Gelegenheit, dieses Terrain früher zu erschließen, wie Voigtländer mit dem Zoomar 36-82 mm f2.8 (1959) oder Nikon mit dem 43-86 mm f3.5 (1963). Beides meines Wissens allerdings noch Vertreter der Vorläufer-Generation der Varifokal-Objektive (mit optischer Kompensation).

Erst 1968 brachte Angénieux das legendäre erste 2-fach Zoom auf den Markt (10 Jahre nach dem ersten 4-fach Zoom für Cine 16 mm). Das 45-90 mm f2.8 wurde bis 1982 ausschließlich für Leica SL-(bzw. R-)Anschluss gebaut.

Erst 1982  kam das 35-70 mm f2.5-3.3 für alle wichtigen SLR-Anschlüsse heraus, ergänzt im gleichen Jahr durch das 70-210 mm f3.5. Etwa gleichzeitig (1986) wurden noch einmal zwei lichtstarke Teleobjektive ausgeliefert (180 mm f2.3 DEM Apo und 200 mm f2.8 DEM ED), um die fabelhaften Möglichkeiten der neuen ED-Gläser im Tele-Bereich zu nutzen. DEM (=Differentiel Element Movement) war eine spezielle Form der Innenfokussierung, die praktischerweise von den Zooms übernommen werden konnte.

Für das erste Foto-Zoom 45-90 mm berichtet Patrice-Hervé Pont in seinem Buch „angénieux – made in Saint-Heand, Loire, France“ ausführlich den besonderen Hintergrund:

Speziell in Deutschland galt unter Fachkundigen (und das war natürlich jeder, der einen Auslöser durchdrücken konnte) in den 1960er Jahren, dass kein Zoom-Objektiv (ja, auch ich sprach damals nur von „Gummilinsen“!) nur annähernd an eine Festbrennweite heran kommen kann… Pont nennt es in seinem Buch die „doctrine allemande“. Ich kann diese Darstellung wirklich nur bestätigen. In der Folge hat Leica für seine Leicaflex strikt auf Zoom-Objektive verzichtet und kam, als die europäischen Hersteller um 1964 zunehmend unter den Druck der japanischen Hersteller gerieten, dadurch noch verstärkt in Not. Angénieux erkannte dies und bot Leica ein damals gerade durch André Masson  (quasi als „Privat-Projekt“) erarbeitetes Foto-Zoom 45-90 mm an. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war Angénieux schon kein Unbekannter Name im Hause Leitz: so wurde an der 8mm-Filmkamera „Leicina“ bereits ein Angénieux-Zoom 7,5-35 mm eingesetzt. Man wurde einig und lancierte das Foto-Zoom für die Leicaflex exklusiv mit einer speziellen Leica-Ästhetik der Fassung ausgestattet. 12 Jahre lang wurde es geliefert – auch für die Leica R3 (Minolta-Leica) SLR.

1990 gab es während der Dämmerung des Autofokus-Zeitalters noch einmal ein neues 28-70 mm f2.6 Zoomobjektiv mit Autofokus, gebaut für Leica R, Minolta, Nikon, Canon.

Die neuen „Foto-Offensiven“ – intern ab 1964, besonders von André Masson gefördert – führten allerdings zu keinem wirtschaftlichen Erfolg. Sie fielen gerade in die Zeit, in der die europäischen Kamera-Hersteller – großenteils verschuldet durch eigene Fehler! – rasant das Terrain gegen die japanischen Hersteller verloren. Zwar bot Angénieux die neuen Zooms und Teles auch für alle wichtigen Japanischen SLR-Kameraanschlüsse an – die Käufer dieser waren aber sehr preis-getrieben. Die Stückzahlen der Angénieux-Spitzenprodukte waren viel zu gering, um damit Geld zu verdienen: 2.000 Stück gesamt vom 45-90 mm (in 12 Jahren!!!), 15.000 vom 35-70 mm, 10.000 vom 70-210 mm, ca. 4.000 vom 28-70 mm. Die damit (und anderen Projekten, die nicht gut liefen) verbundenen hohen Verluste brachten Angénieux erstmals in wirtschaftliche Bedrängnis. Essilor stieg zunächst 1986 als Merhheitseigner (60%) ein – die Synergien reichten aber nicht.

Dann wurde zwischen 1992-1994, also etwa zeitgleich mit der Übernahme der Firma durch Thales, die Fertigung aller SLR-Kleinbild-Fotoobjektive eingestellt.

Man darf nicht übersehen, dass der Nutzen des Zooms für den Film immens viel größer war als für die Fotografie… Die Existenz des Zooms mit hoher Bildqualität hat sogar die Bauweise der Filmkameras drastisch verändert – und die Arbeitsweise an der Kamera und den Stil der Bilder sowieso. Dieser Effekt ist beim Fotografieren viel geringer – man könnte fast sagen: marginal. Wenn man von der reinen Bequemlichkeit bei Reportagen und auf Reisen mal absieht, gibt es eigentlich keinen „Foto-Bildstil“, der die Nutzung eines Zoom-Objektivs voraussetzt – wenn man einmal von dem manieristischen „Effekt“ des Zoomens während der Belichtung absieht…

Fazit: Dass der Name Angénieux heute in der Fotografie-Szene so relativ unbekannt ist, liegt wohl auch daran, dass das Unternehmen sich bereits vor über 25 Jahren aus dem Segment „Foto“ zurückgezogen hat. Ich hoffe, mein Beitrag macht deutlich, dass es aus dem Blickwinkel der Geschichte der optischen Technik unangemessen ist, das Werk dieses Mann in Vergessenheit geraten zu lassen.

Vielleicht müssen „Fotosaurier“ wie ich mehr dazu tun, die Erinnerung an die wesentlichen Innovationsprozesse der Vergangenheit wach zu zu halten. Ich will versuchen, meinen bescheidenen Beitrag dazu zu leisten.

Zeit-Tabelle Angénieux

 

Meine Quellen zum Thema „Angénieux“:

Die Quellenlage zu Informationen über den Menschen Pierre Angénieux und das Unternehmen sind – gemessen an ihrer Bedeutung – mehr als dürftig. Besonders bei den primären Quellen herrscht weitgehend Fehlanzeige. Da die meisten von uns heute zuerst in die Wikipedia schauen, wird das dort auch deutlich: sowohl in der deutschen und englischen und sogar in der französischen Wikipedia sind die Artikel über Mensch und Unternehmen kurz und dürr. Der Bereich der Zusammenarbeit mit der NASA im Raumfahrtsektor nimmt meist einen unangemessen großen Raum ein. Das sind spektakuläre, medienwirksame Ereignisse. Die wirkliche Bedeutung und Wirkung der Innovationen von Angénieux, vor allem in Film-Bereich, wird aus diesen Wikipedia-Artikeln nicht so richtig sichtbar – auch nicht in der französischen Wikipedia. Vielleicht sollten diese Artikel einmal aktualisiert werden…

Vor ein paar Jahren stieß ich auf eine französischsprachige Monografie über Angénieux in Buchform:

„angénieux – made in Saint-Heand, Loire, France“,  Autor: Patrice-Hervé Pont, Editions du Pécari, 2003.

Dieses französischsprachige Buch stellt die Produkte von Angénieux „enzyklopädisch“ und geordnet nach Anwendungsgebieten dar. Viele Detail-Informationen habe ich daraus entnehmen können. Wer Informationen über die bekannten und dokumentierten Produkte aus dem Hause Angénieux sucht, wird hier fündig. Systematisch und detailliert werden alle Objektiv-Typen, ihre Entwicklung über die Jahre, Technische Daten der wichtigsten Produkte bis hin zur Nomenklatur und Objektiv-Nummern behandelt.

Die Monografie ist gewissermaßen von der Firma Angénieux autorisiert, denn der ehemalige Generaldirektor André Masson hat das Vorwort geschrieben.

Ich habe mich über die Jahre durch eine große Zahl von Zeitschriften-Artikeln gepflügt – die ich nicht alle hier auflisten möchte (einige sind in den Wiki-Artikeln aufgeführt), da sie auch meistens nur aus Sekundär-Quellen zitieren.

Neben der Pont-Monografie die wesentlichste Veröffentlichung, die ich hier aufführen kann (und die für den Film-Bereich praktisch alle anderen ersetzen kann) ist die folgende Quelle:

http://www.fdtimes.com/pdfs/articles/angenieux/FDTimes-Angenieux-Special-IBC-Sept2013.pdf

Das kann ich wärmstens empfehlen!

Darüberhinaus ist die Website von Nick Hall über die Entstehung der Zoom-Objektive interessant:

https://www.zoomlenshistory.org.uk/showcase-page/

Mit einer seiner Aussagen habe ich mich im Text kritisch auseinandergesetzt.

Zur Entwicklung der Retrofocus-Objektive aus der Sicht von Zeiss Oberkochen kann man bei dieser Quelle nachlesen:

Klicke, um auf Nasse_Objektivnamen_Distagon.pdf zuzugreifen

Im Juni 2019 erschien eine neue Monografie in Englisch und Französisch: „Angénieux and the Cinema, From Light to Image“ – Autor Silvana Editoriale, das ich hier noch nicht auswerten konnte.

Copyright Fotosaurier, Herbert Börger

Berlin, im August 2019

Dieser Artikel ist in gekürzter Fassung im Online-Fotojournal „fotoespresso“ 4/2019 erschienen.

Bild von Pierre Angénieux mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Firma Thales-Angénieux.