My Crazy Lenses / Meine sehr speziellen Objektive – Focal length 24mm / Brennweite 24mm – FoV 84° – Part I

What was the real improvement in SLR-wideangle-lenses since the invention of the retrofocus principle over the last 65 years? Does my personal judgement from analog-film-days which lead to the definition of „legendary optics“ – which I kept in my lens-portefolio over that time – correlate with objective resolution-measurements? Here are my findings.

1 – Introduction

24mm focal length is a real milestone in spreading the field of the view in wideangle lenses, coming down from FL 35mm over 28mm. For the SLR-camera-user this age started with the appearance of the retrofocus lenses in the 1950s. Several designers came out with this optical principle within three years – with Pierre Angénieux earning the honours of being FIRST (in time and quality – 1950, 35mm f/2.5) in this disciplin.

This is a report about SLR-lenses for 35mm-still-foto-cameras with focal lengths (FL) between 23mm and 25mm.

This is a report about a number of legendary lenses, which I happen to own or could lend from a friend  („phothograf“), most of them being milestones of optical engineering in their respective design-periods.

Drei_24er-Oldies_DSCF1838
Fig 1: three of the very first historical retrofocus-lenses with FL 24mm and 25mm – source: fotosaurier

Over the decades of my own practical use of SLR-lenses (of nearly all makers-brands!) has lead me to an understanding of the quality for normal photographic use.

This collection of test candidates does NOT claim to be a COMPLETE collection of all design legends of 24mm/25mm. There is a large gap in time with prime-lenses between 1984 and 2015. That means: the legendary first historical aspherical lenses in this range are missing in the comparison. If I ever will be able to get hold of them for a test, I would update this article. The modern lenses tested for comparison are (of course) all aspherical types!

In spite of the fact, that important legendary lenses of the 1980s and 90s are missing here, this report allows to draw some interesting conclusions about important steps in optical lens-engineering, which finally lead to Ultra-Wideangel-Lenses which have uniform resolution and contrast over the complete field of view (FoV).

I have always looked for a method to show the quantitative progress in optical quality of photographic lenses over the nearly last 100 years – and I think I have found a good way to understand this progress with my new comparison-charts (Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 see below). What was surprising: the progress over time is independent of the lens-maker and brand. It is generated by a sequence of milestone-like innovations by singular design-legends, innovative calculation progress, creation of new glass-formulations and finally the lens-making-process – espacially allowing for the production of aspherical lens-surfaces! Once the innovation-step is basically made, it is spreading around the globe very quickly (typically within one or two years!).

There are few lenses, which stand out of the general quality-development curve, reaching a higher level of resolution earlier than most others – to be seen here mostly in Fig. 5:

ATTENTION: These measurements are made with USED lenses today, some of which are more than 60 years old! There are influences from ageing and wear (even abuse …) which have become part of the lens-properties when we measure them after long time. However, I only make measurements with samples of lenses, if the optics are clear and undamaged and the mechanics do not show excessive wear or abuse.

Vier_24+25er
Fig. 2: Starting with big-big negative front-meniscus-lenses (at left Angenieux Retrofocus 24mm f/3.5 and Zeiss Jena Flektogon 25mm f/4) the lens-designers soon learnt to reduce the front-lens diameter (at right: Distagon 25mm f/2.8 for Contarex and Olympus OM 24mm f/2,0), creating better results and generating lens-bodies, which were more acceptable  – source: fotosaurier

2 – Data section for 15 historical 24/25mm-prime lenses, 3 modern 23/25mm prime lenses and 4 modern zooms at 24mm-setting:

24er_all-physical-data_1
Fig. 3: Physical Data and resolution data  of all the tested lenses – the c/y-mount-Distagon of 1970 I could not measure stopped down. Therefor it is missing in the following comparison-diagrams. „Milestone-lenses“ are marked green – source: fotosaurier

Out of this Chart I have filtered two separate charts, showing the development of RESOLUTION over the decades.

Fig. 4 shows the center-resolution open aperture (blue) and stopped down to the aperture with the highest resolution (green) in the center:

23-25mm_Resolution_Center

23-25mm_Diagram_Center
Fig. 4: Center Resolution-values  of 21 Lenses at FL 23-25mm at open aperture (blue) and stopped down to optimum aperture (which means: the aperture at which the weighted mean over all the 46 measurement-places in the 24x36mm-frame is maximum. (The maximum center resulution-value of the individual lens may be higher.) In Fig. 3 you can look-up, which the optimum aperture is. – source: fotosaurier

The second chart is showing the corner-resolution at open aperture (blue) vs. the best resolution-value stopped down (green) in the corners (mean value over all four corners) – where „corner“ means a value of 88% – 92% of the full picture circle of the lens which is 21.5 mm radius:

23-25mm_Resol_Corners

23-25mm_Diagram_Corners
Fig. 5: Corner Resolution-values  of 21 Lenses at FL 23-25mm at open aperture (blue) and optimum aperture (green, which means: the aperture at which the weighted mean of all the 46 measurement-places over the 24x36mm-frame is maximum. (The maximum corner resulution-value of the individual lens may be higher.) – source: fotosaurier

You see, that nearly all of the difference in resolution of historical top-notch wideangle-lenses for SLR is in the corners of the picture (and of course also continuously in-between center to corner areas). This is easy to understand, because the difficulties for lens-correction rise dramatically with the FoV, which is here 84 degrees corner to corner diagonally.

Besides the resolution, there are other important properties, which improved dramatically over these six decades of lens-engineering history:

a – Chromatic aberration (CA in pixel): It is very low in all these lenses in the center. It typically ranged between 4 and 8 pixels in the corners for the very first lenses of this type. It stayed around 2-3 over the time before aspherical lens-surfaces could practically erase it. Today with the best modern lenses, the value is close to zero (under 0.5) without camera correction and zero with correction.

Among the early lenses the Zeiss Distagon 25mm f/2.8 (though not really outstanding in resolution compared to the other early lenses) pops out, because it had already values of 2-2.5 pixel in the corners – together with the „unicorn“ Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5.

Please consider, that the CA-value in pixel for the same lens is the higher the smaller the pixel size of the sensor is  – here 1 pixel is 3.77 µm.

b – Linear distortion (%): distortion shows – from the beginning – the biggest differences between the legendary lenses of the different designers and brands. The designer has to do a compromise-job in each lens, balancing out the design between resolution, chromatic aberrations and distortions. 0,5 pixel is a very good CA-value even acceptable for acrchitectural work (though „zero“ would be better, of course), 0,75-1,0 pixel is a good compromise-value and 1.5 pixel just acceptable for alround use.

Looking at the spread-sheet Fig. 3, it is surprising, that Angénieux with the very first retrofocus-lens of this wide angle decided to go for nearly „ZERO“ distortion in his design! He had gone close to zero in the 35mm and 28mm-designs before that, too! Probably he wanted to give a statement of his art, because this was really difficult at that time … At the same time he accepted a somewhat higher CA of 7-8 pixels (corresponding to 0.03-0.04 mm). In my collection of top-notch lenses such a low distortion does not appear again before the modern Zeiss Batis Distagon 25mm f/2.0 – and only the legendary 1971 Minolta MD 24mm f/2.8 (including the VFC-Version) came very close with ca. 0.18-0.29% distortion in my measurements.

c – The close-focusing system: there are further innovations to consider, e.g. the lens-design for close focusing. Here one of the important innovations is the floating-element close focusing system – introduced 1971 by Nikon and Minolta first for wideangle lenses as far as I know. This is one of the early merits of the two 1971/75 24mm-Minolta-lenses.

3 – Conclusions:

3.1 Center-resolution:

Since the early days of geometrical optic lens-design with Petzval, Abbe and Seidel, lenses could be designed absolutely perfect for nearly unlimited image-quality (resolution and CA) „on-axis“, which means: in the center of the picture-field … And the  famous designers did it all the time – as soon as they used 4 or more elements in a photographic lens-system.

The first time, I found a proof for that, was with my resolution-measurements on Bertele’s first Ernostar 100mm f/2.0 from 1923 (a four-element-design WITHOUT COATING!). Compared to the legendary Leitz Apo-Macro-Elmarit 100mm f/2.8 from 1987, this lens achieved 98% of the resolution in the center – but only in the center! See my Ernostar-Bog-Article here. (This was the very first report in my photo-blog …)

So, it is not really surprising, what Fig. 4 is telling us: all top-notch lenses show a very high resolution level in the image center since the invention of the retrofocus wideangle design in the 1950s – and they are all on the about same level – though being historical lenses with up to 65 years of age on their back! The reason for that result is, of couse, that only legendary lenses of all brands are taken into the comparison! Maybe the Takumar-lens happens to be one of the weaker examples …

The Olympus OM 24mm f/3.5 „shift“ drops down somewhat against its neighbours. That is no quality issue: this lens has an image-circle diameter of 57mm for up to 10 mm shift! It came out 1984 long before Canon brought out its famous tilt-shift-lenses … Look at the corner-resolution result of this lens in Fig. 5 – it resolves extremely even over its FoV!

in this graph I marked two horizontal lines: one for the resolution of 2.000 LP/PH (linepairs per picture height), corresponding to the resolution of a 24 MP-sensor, which today is the de-facto-standard for  modern digicams. It normally has 4.000 by 6.000  pixels – and 4.000 pixels in the picture height, corresponding to 2.000 Linepairs. At the same time it is just (+15%) above the 21 MP which I estimate for the resolution of modern analogue (general purpose) film emulsions.

The other (upper) horizontal line marks the 3.184 LP/PH Nyquist-frequency of the Sensor in the Sony A7R4-digicam. This is physically the limiting resolution-value for the camera itself. Today, however, the software-algorithms in the camaras can generate structures in the picture, which are typically 15 – 20% higher in resolution, compared to the Nyquist-frequency. And they do this without creating an artificially looking „oversharpened“ picture! Good job!

This means:

All the legendary historical 24/25mm-retrofocus-lenses for SLR-cameras do out-resolve the modern 24 MP-Digicams in the center – mostly even with open aperture! And many of these lenses even come very close to (or exceed) the Nyquist-Frequency of my 60,2 MP digital camera.

Among the historical lenses two examples peek out a little bit (they peek out much more in the graph for the corner-resolution!):

The legendary 1959 Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5 exceeds the Nyquist-frequency of 3.184 LP/PH – and stopped down to f11 it is in the center the highest resolving of my 24/25mm-lenses until today. Together with the tremendous result of its corner-resolution it is one of the exceptional lenses, which I call my „UNICORNS„. Until today, I have not found any explanation for the astonishing early level of performance of this lens – how could that have been achieved? (15 years before the next-best Olympus-lens!) – and who did it? – and where did this person go afterwards, when Topcons innovative power faded out, to bring in her/his inginuity? (… to Olympus?). (This observation refers to other early Topcor-lenses al well!)

The other unicorn peeking out here is the Olympus OM 24 mm f/2.0 of 1973. In my lens-collection it is exceeded only by the 40 years younger Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2.0.

Referring to the zoom-lenses (set at FL 24mm) in this test: I just was curious, where the modern zooms would stand in such a comparison. We learn that the 1kg-Monster-Tokina 24-70mm zoom at 24mm has one of the best results – even at f/2.8 … in the center of the picture.

At the end of the line-up of 21 lenses I put the Fujinon-Zoom 32-64mm f/4 at 32 mm on the Fujifilm GFX100 (33x44mm – 102 MP), which corresponds to FL 26mm on „full-frame 35mm“. This shows, that for an essentially higher resolution in the picture-center, we today have to go to a larger sensor-format.

3.2 Corner-resolution:

Fig. 5 contains the important informations of this comparison-test. It shows, that step by step all the improvements in innovative design, glass-formulations and aspherical surface-generation were needed to bring finally the corner-resolution of the picture up on par with the center resolution at 24mm focal length, which is possible today – but only with the use of aspherical lens-elements!

In the graph for the corner-resolution I have added a third horizontal line, which marks the resolution at 50 Lines/mm – corresponding to 600 LP/PH. This is needed to judge the corner-resolution of the early historical lenses.

In the 1960s a wideangle-lens was rated „very good“, when it achieved a resolution of 40 Lines/mm (Modern Photography and others). I have written an article about this already here (in German).  Open aperture most super-wideangle-lense started open aperture in the range of 26 to 32 L/mm in the 1950s and 60s. Stopped down practically all the tested historical lenses surpassed the 40 L/mm-limit.

From 1958 on (ENNA) the stop-down corner-resolution rises continualy (with the exception of the two „unicorns“, already identified in Fig.4) until end of the 1970s,  it arrives close to the 2.000 LP/PH-level, which means: from now on the top-notch-lenses out-perform standard analogue fine-grain film (1977 Nikkor and 1984 Olympus). This last step was then achieved by the use of extraordinary dispersion glass-types.

The two „unicorns“ in this test arrive much earlier at this level: the Topcor 2,5cm f/3.5 out-performs analogue film already in 1959 and the 1973 Olympus OM 24mm f/2.0 exceeds this and comes close to todays modern aspherical lenses.

The modern aspherical prime-lenses are represented in my test by two very different samples:

There is the 23mm f/4 Fujinon, which originally is a GFX-lens – but in this test it is measured in the 24x36mm-Mode also with 60.2 MP on the GFX100, showing the state of the art for these modern aspherical lenses.

Just as I made my measurements for this test, the SIGMA i-Series 24mm f/3.5 arrived as a representative of a new thinking: no „impressive“ technical data   – but (hopefully) impressive preformance instead. The result shows: it achieves reference status on a 60.2 MP-sensor with corner-resolution at 85-95% of center-resolution, plus zero-distortion, zero-CA and very close focussing!

Also great news: modern zooms like the Sigma G 12-24mm f/4 – measured at 24mm – arrive now at this level of prime-lenses also in the corners!

As I had no samples of the early historical aspherical lenses in this test, we can not see, in which steps the aspherical lens surfaces moved the wideangle-performance in the picture-corners to the present level.

Maybe this gap can be filled out in some future times.

NOTE 1 – All resolution-values, which are published in this article, refer to MTF30 – what means: the point on the MTF-curve (see Fig. 7), which hits the 30% contrast value.

NOTE 2 – in Part II of this Article I will share some more informations about each individual lens (including pictures, MTF-curves and  lens-schemes).

Appendix: Method of measurement and definition of results

I use the set-up and software by IMATEST with the original IMATEST-Target. I use the large SFRplus-Setup-Image with a physical hight of 783mm bar-to-bar vertically. The distance from target to lens-flange is 0,97 meters. In this area 46 targets are analysed and I share MFT30-weighted-mean-resolution-values (all-over, center and corner), edge-sharpness, linear distortion and maximum lateral CA-values.

Resolution-values are given in Line-Pairs per Picture Height (LP/PH) – where the picture-height is always 24mm. Edge-sharpness is given in pixels (width 3,77 µm).

#TestChart_Angén90f2,5_f2,5
Fig. 6: IMATEST test-target 783mm-bar-to-bar distance. Resolution is NOT measured in the small concentric targets, but at the outside-edges of the black boxes, which are tilted b ca. 5 degrees – source: fotosaurier.

For the measurement I used a SONY A7Rm4 with 60,2 MP-resolution which has a pixel-width of 3,77 µm. The theoretical resolution-limit of the sensor is 3.184 LP/PH (Nyquist Frequency).

The camera setting is used basic as delivered from factory at ISO100 and exposure-compensation of -0.7 stops, using out-of-camera JPEGs. All measurements are made with the identical camera-body (which is important for a precise comparison: I have used one other (earlier) body of this model in comparison, which gave resolution-values between 50 and 200 LP/PH lower than my own camera-body). The repeatability with this method I estimate at 2-2.5%, using ALWAYS manual focusing on the lens with maximum focusing enlargement (11.9-fold) in the camera-viewing-system. Measurement is repeated with re-focusing until a stable maximum resolution at open-aperture of the lens is found and then pictures of the resolution-target are taken with the focussing made wide open for all full down-stops of each lens.

Edge profile (edge-sharpness) is the width of the rise from 10% to 90% intensity at a dark-bright edge in the test target – measured in pixel (width 3,77 with the camera used) – Example shown here for the latest 24mm-prime-lens SIGMA i-Series 24mm f/3,5 – at open aperture f/3,5:

Edge+MFT_Sigma24f3,5
Fig. 7: Edge-profile (top) and MTF-curve (bottom) from the IMATEST software – here the perfect graphs for the brand new Sigma 24mm f/3.5 – at open aperture. I will publish these Curves for all the lenses in PART II of this article – source: fotosaurier

Cromatic Aberration (lateral in the picture-plane) is also measured in pixel separate for red against green and blue against green over the full picture field – in the spread-sheet I note the maximum value, which is in most cases for blue and for most historical lenses in the corners of the picture – sometimes however in the intermediate area.

For more details of testing read my special blog-Article here.

Copyright: Herbert Börger

Berlin, March/April 2021

Altweibersommer die DRITTE – 2020

(Alle Bilder Copyright fotosaurier 2020.)

Nach zwei knochen-trockenen Jahren (2018/19) im Raum Berlin hat dieser Herbst noch einmal genügend Feuchtigkeit gebracht, um einen Morgennebel zur richtigen Zeit zu produzieren.

Ohne die Nebel-Tautropfen – bei der richtigen Wetterlage – sieht man ja die Werke der Baldachinspinne kaum: den „Altweibersommer„. Am 1. Oktober war es endlich mal wieder so weit; zwar mit bescheidener Ausbeute aber immerhin sehr anregend und erkenntnisreich …

Anscheinend hatte der Tau auf den Spinnfäden schon lange gelegen bis ich das richtige „Foto-Licht“ hatte (Blitz kommt für mich nicht infrage!) – vielleicht hatten die Gespinnste auch schon vom Vortag gestanden, bis der Tau sie endlich sichtbar machte. Das Resultat sieht man auf dem ersten Bild: die „Perlenschnüre“ der Tautropfen sind nicht so regelmäßig wie sonst.

FreiOtto_DSCF0191_100%_blog

Bild 1: Unregelmäßige Tautropfen-Ketten auf den Spinnfäden des Altweibersommers. 100%-Vergrößerung aus Bild 2.

Stellenweise sind sich einzelne Tautropfen zu größeren Tropfen zusammengeflossen – gleichzeitig sind (fast immer ÜBER den großen Tau-Perlen) Lücken in den Ketten entstanden.

Bei dem nächsten Bild hatte ich eine Assoziation – und dann ein Déjà vu:

FreiOtto_DSCF0191_blog

Bild 2: Ist dies der „Baldachin“ nach dem die Baldachinspinne ihren Namen bekommen hat? Oder auch: „Zu Ehren Frei Otto, dem Architekten des Münchner Olympiastadium-Daches!

Um ehrlich zu sein: meine erste Assoziation war ein Hochzeitskleid (wohl weil wir gerade eine Hochzeit in der engeren Familie hatten). Dann fiel es mir wie Schuppen von den Augen: genau das ist der „Baldachin“ nach dem die diese Gebilde produzierende Baldachinspinne ihren Namen haben könnte.

Etwas später hatte ich dann die Assoziation mit dem Dach des Münchner Olympiastadiums / Architekt Frei Otto – ausgelöst durch eine Kolumne von Götz Aly (Historiker in Berlin und Kolumnist der Berliner Zeitung)  in der er an den – kürzlich verstorbenen – Architekten Conrad Roland erinnerte. Conrad Roland seinerseits war Kollege von Frei Otto bei der Realisierung des Olympia-Daches. (Die Kolumne finden Sie hier.) Kurz danach erfand Conrad Roland dann derartige Seilstrukturen als Klettergerüste auf Spielplätzen – wo sie sich dann in den 1970er Jahren bis heute stark durchsetzten!

Deshalb widme ich das folgende Bild 3 Conrad Roland:

Oleander1_DSCF0200_blog

Bild 3: „Zu Ehren Conrad Roland„, dem Erfinder der Klettergerüste aus gespannten Seilen.

Der Oleander ist neu in unserem Garten. Hier spannen vier Knospentriebe sozusagen ein Tetraeder auf – und die kleine Spinne hatte offensichtlich Probleme, aus dieser Geometrie wieder herauszufinden. Vielleicht ist das eine Analogie zu dem bekannten optischen Phänomen: egal aus welcher Richtung man mit einem Laser auf einen aus Glas geschliffene Tetraeder trifft: der reflektiert diesen Laserstrahl exakt in sich zurück (weshalb man mit dem auf den Mond aufgestellen Glas-Tetraeder den exakten Abstand des Mondes zur Erde messen konnte – über die Laufzeit des Lichtes hin und zurück!)

Möglicherweise finden Sie diese Assoziation etwas skurill?

Dann gehen wir doch einfach wieder zu den ästhethischen Aspekten – obwohl die Spinne natürlich keine Ahnung von unserer Ästhetik als Mensch hat …

Hier könnte die Spinne – angeregt von der klare Ästhetik der Oleander-Blätter (ja das haben Sie richtig erkannt: es sind Zweiecke!) zu einer schlichten und einfachen Struktur angeregt worden sein:

OleanderBasic_DSCF0197_blog

Bild 4: Very basic – sehr minimalistisches Spinnweben-Design, passend zum Oleander-Blatt

Neu ist in diesem Jahr 2020 gegenüber Altweibersommer 2016 und Altweibersommer 2017 (Link zu den früheren Artikeln) noch, dass ich eine andere Kamera verwende: ein Fujifilm GFX100. Mit dem verwendeten Makroobjektiv 120 mm f/4 zusammen sind das „schlappe“ 2.481 Gramm am langen Arm (ohne Objektivdeckel!). Ich brauche nun kein Fitnessstudio mehr.

Über diese beeindruckende Kamera wird noch an anderer Stelle einmal ausführlich berichtet werden.

Ich nenne die Kombination auch „mein Garten-Mikroskop„. Mit 102 Mega-Pixel gibt es hier sehr große Reserven für Detailvergrößerungen und Details die man vorher durch den Sucher nicht gesehen hat. Hier ein Beispiel:

FreiOtto2_DSCF0159_blog

Bild 5: Dieses Bild ist bereits ein Ausschnitt aus dem 102 MP-Bild von etwa einem Viertel der ursprünglichen Bildfläche.

Das folgende ist eine Teilansicht mit 100%-Vergrößerung (ein Pixel auf Ihrem Bildschirm entspricht etwa einem Pixel auf dem Kamerasensor).

FreiOtto2_DSCF0159_100%_blog

Bild 6: 100% Ansicht eines Ausschnittes aus Bild 5. Sensor-Empfindlichkeit ISO 800!

Der Sensor fügt dem Bild mindestens bis ISO 800 kein Rauschen hinzu – die Szene wirkt auch bei 100%-Vergrößerung noch überzeugend plastisch.

Ausser (kleinen) Nachjustagen an der Gradationskurve (meistens S-förmig) wurden die Bilder weder in Farbe noch in der Struktur nachbearbeitet (alle Parameter bei Aufnahme in Null-Stellung – Filmsimulation „Velvia“). Keinerlei Schärfung!

Das wirkt man bei den letzten drei Bilder für mich ähnlich überzeugend.

Dahlie1_DSCF0147_blog

Bild 6: Dahlie

Vergehen1_DSCF0143_blog

Bild 7: Rose

Dornen_DSCF0168_blog

Bild 8: … einfach ein paar Rosenblätter …

Herbert Börger

Berlin, 20. Oktober 2020

Fotosauriers optisches Testverfahren für Objektive mit IMATEST

Ich messe die optische Qualität von Objektiven mit Hilfe des IMATEST-Verfahrens. (Imatest ist eine 2004 in Boulder, Colorado, USA gegründete Firma.)

Das durch das Objektiv mit der Digitalkamera aufgenommene Testbild (Target) stellt eine Datei dar (Bild-Daten + Exif-Datei). Diese Datei wird mittels einer (kostenpflichtigen) IMATEST-Software analysiert (IMATEST-Studio oder IMATEST-Master). Die Analyse liefert – abhängig von der Art des Targets – eine ganze Reihe von optischen Prüfergebnissen, die letztlich alle auf der MTF-Kurve basieren.

Das Basis-Verfahren wird Imatest SFR genannt (Imatest spatial frequency response), was man allgemein als „Modulation Transfer Function“ (MTF) bezeichnet. Analysiert wird eine Hell-Dunkel-Kante, die Imatest als „clean, sharp, straight black-to-white or dark-to-light edge“. Die hellen und dunklen Flächen, die an die Hell-Dunkel-Kante angrenzen müssen sehr gleichmäßigen (konstanten) Helligkeitsverlauf besitzen. Der Analyse-Algorithmus basiert auf dem Matlab-Programm „sfrmat“. Im Prinzip ließe sich dafür jede beliebige scharfe Kante verwenden. Imatest empfiehlt und verwendet eine Kante unter 5.71° Neigung und einem Kontrast von 4:1, das dies die am besten reproduzierbaren Ergebnisse liefert:

SlantedEdge
Analysefelder an einer als „slanted-edge“ bezeichneten Hell-Dunkel-Kante, Neigung 5.71°, Kontrast 4:1     horizontal (links)- vertikal (rechts)

Es versteht sich, dass die grafische Qualität dieses Testbildes/Test-Charts eine wichtige Rolle bezüglich der Reproduzierbarkeit von damit erzielten Prüfergebnissen spielt. Deshalb habe ich mir die große Test-Chart „SFRplus 5×9“ von Imatest aus USA liefern lassen (sie kostet derzeit $430,00). Der Abstand zwischen dem oberen und unteren schwarzen Balken beträgt 783 mm – die Gesamtbreite ca. 1.600 mm:

SFRplus-Test-Chart5x9

Die SFR-Messung erfolgt hier, wie vorstehend schon beschrieben, nicht etwa an den kleinen radialen Rosetten, die in die Quadrate eingebettet sind, sondern an den horizontalen und vertikalen Kanten der um 5.71° gedrehten grauen Quadrate.

Das Testbild kommt als eingerollter Druck und muss noch auf eine perfekt ebene, stabile, dauerhafte Unterlage aufgeklebt werden. Das habe ich von einem professionellen Laminier-Betrieb auf dem stabilsten Sandwich-Trägermaterial erledigen lassen ((Blasen/Falten würden das Testbild unbrauchbar machen!). Dazu habe ich auf der Rückseite zwei Al-Profile zur Versteifung und Wandmontage aufkleben lassen. Die genau vertikale und verdrehungsfreie Wandmontag habe ich mit einem Kreuzlaser unterstützt vorgenommen.

Eine typische Aufnahme dieses Testbildes durch das zu untersuchende Objektiv mit der Digitalkamera sollte so aussehen:

Aufnahe-IMATEST-korrekt

IMATEST stellt folgende Check-Liste für die Arbeit mit der Test-Chart auf:

IMATEST - hohe Abforderungen
„Checklist“ für das reproduzierbare Arbeiten mit dem Imatest-Verfahren

Vieles ist da zu beachten – und darüberhinaus entdeckt man in der praktischen Ausführung noch eine Menge Details, die einem eine sehr hohe Konzentration abfordern… zum Beispiel die Ausleuchtung:

IMATEST-Beleuchtung

LED-Lampen! … aber bitte nicht von Akkus gespeist – da ändert sich gegen Ende der Akku-Laufzeit die Beleuchtungsstärke. Unbeding Beleuchtungsintensität messen!

Bezüglich des Arbeitsabstandes als Funktion der Pixel-Anzahl der Kamera gilt, dass die große SFRplus TestChart für die 60 MP der Sony A7Rm4, die ich einsetze, gerade ausreichend ist.

Es kann im Prinzip jeder machen, der eine hohe Motivation dazu hat – aber es ist von äußerst großem Nutzen, wenn man viel von Optik und Physik versteht … damit man am Ende nicht Hausnummern misst! 😉

Ich werde jetzt nicht mehr in jedes Detail gehen. Natürlich ist die nächste wirklich wichtige Hürde, die man nehmen muss, die Ausrichtung der Kamera/Objektiv-Achse zur Mitte und zur Ebene des Testbildes. (Ich arbeite da mit zwei Kreuz-Lasern.)

Wenn man schließlich alles im Griff hat und man hat korrekte Aufnahme-Dateien des Testbildes erstellt, dann ist der Rest mit der Imatest-Software tatsächlich eine Knopfdruck-Aktion: mit dem oben dargestellten Chart SFRplus definiert das Programm automatisch 46 „ROI“ (region of interest) – also kleine Ausschnitte der „slanted-edges“ wie oben beschrieben – mal horizontal mal vertikal orientiert – und analysiert dann binnen weniger Sekunden die Auflösung an diesen 46 Stellen, die MTF-Kurve, ein (vorher festgelegtes) Kantenprofil und die Auflösungskurve über dem Bildkreisradius (getrennt nach sagittaler und meridionaler Orientierung.

Kantenprofil+MTF-Kurve
Beispiel einer Kantenprofil/MTF-Auswertung an einer einzelnen ROI-Position (14% rechts vom Bildzentrum)

Das wird in Graphen oder auch in Tabellenform ausgelesen – bzw. als Datei, mit der man weitere programmierte Auswertungen und Darstellungen durchführen könnte.

Angén90f2,5_f11_Multi-ROI_N
MTF30-Auflösungswerte in Linienpaaren je Bildhöhe (60 MP-Sensor!) in den ROI-Positionen mit überwiegend sagittaler Orientierung. Man erkennt, dass die Methode bis sehr weit in die äußerenen Bildecken hinein funktioniert!

Auflösungs-Daten kann man für mehrere MTF-Kontrast-Werte (MTF10, MTF20, MTF30, MTF50) ausgeben lassen. Dann wird neben den Einzelwerten in der obigen grafischen Darstllung auch der gewichtete Mittelwert der (z.B.) MTF30-Auflösung über das GESAMTE Bildfeld, der Mittelwert für die MITTE, der Mittelwert für den Übergangsbereich und der Mitttelwert für die Ecken ausgegeben:

MTF30-Mittelwerte
Gesamt- (gewichtet!) und Zonen-Mittelwerte aus den Einzelwerten der darüber dargestellten Messung – die Mittelwerte enthalten ALLE sagittalen und meridionalen Meßergebnisse.

Außer den Auflösungs- und MTF-Daten werden Chromatische Aberration und Verzeichnung ermittelt.

Ich messe stets bei ALLEN Blenden jedes Objektives und definiere als „optimale Blende“ der jeweiligen Optik die mit dem höchsten (gewichteten) Gesamt-Mittelwert der Auflösung über das gesamte Bildfeld. Es kann dabei sein, dass an diesem Blendenwert die maximale Auflösung in der Bildmitte schon überschritten ist, aber die Rand/Ecken-Auflösung noch deutlich steigt.

Zur Charakterisierung einer Optik habe ich mich entschieden, folgende Auflösungswerte anzugeben – und zwar einmal bei Offenblende, einmal bei optimaler Blende:

  • Mittelwert gesamte Bildfläche (gewichtet mit 1/0.75/0.25)
  • Mittelwert der Meßpunkte in Bildmitte (bis 30% Bildradius)
  • Mittelwert der Meßpunkte Rand/Ecken (außerhalb 70& Bildradius)
  • MTF-Kurve (über der Frequenz aufgetragen)
  • Kurve der Auflösung über dem Bildradius (Mitte=0 …. Ecke=100)

Außerdem Verzeichnung und CA. In meinen Vergleichstabellen kann das dann so aussehen:

Tabellen-Beispiel Auflösung

Gelegentlich kann die 3D-Darstellung der Auflösung über der Bildfläche noch zu weiteren Erkenntnissen beitragen. Hier ein Beispiel (dasselbe Objektiv, wie iden anderen Beispielen weiter oben und unten!):

Angén90f11_Merid+Sagit_3D
3D-Darstellung der meridionalen (links) und sagittalen (rechts) MTF50-Auflösungswerte 

Alle Messungen erfolgen an derselben Digitalkamera Sony A7Rm4 mit 60 MP-Sensor und E-Mount-Objektivanschluß unter stets gleicher Einstellung von Auflösung und kamerainterem RAW-Converter (z.B. Schärfung auf Wert „0“).

Soviel zur konkreten Messung der Qualität der optischen Systeme. Und damit wäre für fabrikneue Objektive an einer Kamera, für die die Optik hergestellt wurd, eigentlich alles gesagt.

Bei meinen Untersuchungen treten allerdings folgende Einflüsse auf:

a) Ich nehme hier die Messungen an historischen Objektiven vor, die bis zu 100 Jahre alt sein können. Die meisten davon sind in einem normalen Abnutzungs- und Alterungs-Zustand, wobei ich festhalten möchte, dass nur Objektive in ein Vergleichsprogramm aufgenommen werden, die keine starken Ablagerungen, Beläge und Separationen an Linsenflächen zeigen, die schon als „Schleier“ in Erscheinung treten. Staubpartikel im Inneren und mäßige Putzspuren sind nicht auszuschließen – aber alle geprüften Optiken erscheinen – auch mit einer LED-Punktlampe durchleuchtet – weitgehend klar! Welchen Einfluss die Alterung und „normale“ Verschmutzung auf die Messergebnisse haben kann ich nicht klären – ich schlage vor, dass man die Ergebnisse pragmatisch eben als das ansieht, was sie sind: nämlich die Eigenschaften (unterschiedlich) gealterter historischer optischer Geräte! Die Ergebnisse liefern allenfalls einen orientierenden Eindruck vom Auslegungs- und Neu-Zustand dieser Objektive. Da die Ergebnisse in vielen Fällen überraschend gut ausfallen, darf man die Dinge auch gerne so bestaunen, wie sie jetzt erscheinen. Ich kann mir kaum vorstellen, dass die Optiken durch die Alterung BESSER geworden sind…

b) Um die Objektive der unterschiedlichsten historischen Kamerasysteme (wie Exakta, Alpa, M42,…) an die Kamera mit E-Mount anzuschließen, wird ein ADAPTER benötigt. Damit tritt ein rein mechanisch-geometrisches Problem im Versuchsaufbau auf: nach meinen bisherigen Erfahrungen ist genau das die zweitgrößte Fehlerquelle bei den Versuchen, über die ich berichte. Weil der Adapter nun ein Bestandteil der Fassung des Objektives ist, verschlechtern sich oft Zentrierung und Ausrichtung der optischen Achse relativ zum digitalen Bildsensor.

Die IMATEST-Software liefert bezüglich dieses Problemes allerdings eine wichtige Hilfestellung:

Angén90f2,5_f11_Geometry
Analyse der Geometrie der Imatest-Bilddatei: in der untersten Zeile stehen die „Convergence angles“ in horizontaler und Vertikaler Richtung: wenn die Zahlenwerte hier „Null“ sind, ist die Ebene des Testbildes relativ zur Sensor-Ebene ideal parallel ausgerichtet (d.h. die Linien des Rasters schneiden sich im „Unendlichen“. Die Bildmitten müssen sich dann nicht exakt decken (s. dritte Zeile von unten: central square pixel shift).

Man kann dieses Analyse-Ergebnis benutzen, um den Meßaufbau mit dem jeweiligen Adapter  optimal auszurichten. Ich habe mir derzeit eine Toleranz von <0.1 Grad bei den Konvergenz-Winkeln gesetzt.

c) Die größte  – und leider nicht sicher abzuklärende – Fehlerquelle bei diesen Messungen an historischen Objektiven, die für die Benutzung mit „Analog-Film“ konstruiert wurden, ist die unbekannte Wechselwirkung zwischen Optik und Digital-Sensor („Digital-Tauglichkeit“).

Hier sehe ich aufgrund meiner Erfahrungen drei Haupt-Probleme:

c1) Mögliche Reflexionen zwischen einer oder mehreren Linsenflächen und der Sensoroberfläche. Das kann sich zonenweise als Kontrastminderung auswirken oder auch das Bild ganz gravierend stören. In meinem Blog-Beitrag über das Ernostar 100mm f2.0 habe ich eine solche Erscheinung beschrieben (mit dem 42 MP Sony-Sensor).

Ernostar (die 2.) – Streulicht-Problem auf Anolog-Film?

Dort bildete sich beim Abblenden über f5.6 ein großer, milchig aufgehellter Bereich in der Bildmitte. Am 24 MP-APSC-Sensor in der Fujifilm-X-T2 (bzw. X-Pro2) trat dieselbe Erscheinung nicht auf. Dabei habe ich auch untersucht, dass diese Erscheinung auf Analog-Film bei diesem Ernostar-Objektiv nicht auftrat.

c2) Anti-Aliasing-Filter als zusätzliche optische Elemente können einen nennenswerten Einfluß auf die Bildqualität nehmen. Das ist sehr anschaulich im Artikel von H.H.Nasse unter lenspire.zeiss.com beschrieben.

https://lenspire.zeiss.com/photo/app/uploads/2018/11/Nasse_Objektivnamen_Distagon.pdf

Allerdings besitzt die verwendete Sony A7Rm4 kein Anti-Aliasing Filter, sodass ich nicht davon ausgehe, dass es in meinen Untersuchungen diesen Einfluss gibt.

c3) Hintere Schnittweite (Abstand zwischen hinterstem Linsenscheitel und der Film/Sensor-Ebene) und daraus möglicherweise resultierende sehr flache Einfalls-Winkel der Strahlen auf den Sensor. Was der Film verkraftet (und zwangsweise mit starkem Helligkeitsabfall im Außenbereich des Bildes quittiert = starke Vignettierung) bekommt dem Sensor nicht: es kommt zu schlimmsten Einbrüchen der Auflösung und Farbübertragung! Auch das ist im Nasse-Artikel sehr anschaulich beschrieben!

Diese Erscheinung gilt grundsätzlich für alle (symmetrischen) Weitwinkelobjektive der Brennweite <35mm an Digitalsensoren, also meistens für die Weitwinkelobjektive mit Bildwinkel >70°, die für analoge Meßsucherkameras gebaut wurden. Für Retrofokus-Objektive gilt das nicht.

Ich rechne aber damit, dass es auch noch andere, unbekannte Wechselwirkungen zwischen Analog-Objektiv-Strahlengang und Digitalsensor gibt. Deshalb ist für mich die wichtigste Voraussetzung für die VERGLEICHBARKEIT von Messergebnissen mittels Digitalkamera, dass immer dieselbe Kamera dafür verwendet wird – mit immer gleichen Einstellungen des RAW-Converters.

Copyright Fotosaurier, Herbert Börger, Berlin, 07. März 2020