Long Telephoto-Lenses and Temperature

Would you expect, that the optical performance of your photographic lenses can be seriously influenced by the operating temperature? Have you ever realized lack of sharpness in extreme environmental temperature conditions?

The simple answer is, of course, that within the specifications for use, given by the makers, there should be no such concern. But it is not that simple.

For amateur astronomers with their mostly very long telescope-focal-length optics (mirror or lens) this fact is very common:

before using the instrument in the clear and mostly cold winter-nights, you have to put the telescope early enough outside (shielded against due) to bring it into a thermal equilibrium with the ambient air at the time you start your observations. The reason: during essential temperature-changes of the optical components (mirrors, lenses) and their mounting devices, their surface-shapes and adjustment change and destroy the extremly precise optical alignment – until the thermal equilibrium is restored. The refractor-lenses may be mounted to allow for some thermal differences, but large mirrors have to be mounted and adjusted extremely precise, so that the cooling-down of the mount, that holds the mirror, may even generate mechanical tension on the mirror – and that generates optical distortions! So we should remind: the absolute temperatures are not the problem – but the thermal transition stages from warm to cold or opposite way!

This fact is also an important design aspect for telescopes: the preferred structure is „as open as possible“ to allow the air to circulate and to generate a good heat-exchange with the internal telescope structure to speed up this process. While the air gets colder during the night, the instrument’s optics can follow close enough to keep the temperature difference low.

There is an impressive document in the archives of the Mt. Wilson Observatory (near L.A., USA) describing the „first-light“-moment of the new 2,5 meter mirror telescope (Hooker-Telescope) on November 1, 1917 – use this link to the adventurous story! („First light“ is the moment, when somebody looks through the finished instrument for the first time.) Here the first-light moment at Mt. Wilson is described near the end of the long text in this link and shows, what a three hour cool-down time made to the optical properties of the 2.5 meter mirror, (which was made by George Willis Ritchey – and allowed for the detection of the expansion of the Universe by Edwin Hubble shortly after taking this telescope into service.).

Picture 1: 2,5 m (100 inch) Hooker-telescope on Mt. Wilson: just struts hold the mirrors to ease the circulation of air for for a fast achievement of  temperature equilibrium – source: Ken Spencer, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Many instruments in astronomy are closed assemblies, using a corrector-plate (Schmidt-system) or meniscus-lens (Maksutov-System) in the entry of the tube and the mirror at the rear-end (catadioptric telescope – see also my specific blog-article here.) The big disadvantage of these closed systems is the „inertia“ in cooling down due to the closed volume in the telescope tube. Therefore often slits around correctors and mirrors are placed, which allow for sufficient circulation of air through the tube – and even active ventilation is used to shorten the period to reach equilibrium. In some big modern telescopes, the mirror may even be actively temperature-controlled.

Picture 2: „Closed“-tube optical system Maksutov-Cassegrain-Teleskop – source: Wikipedia – Author: Halfblue – http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/.

Long telephoto-lenses for normal photography can not be open systems, because the lens-barrels definitely have to be tightly sealed to avoid the invasion of dust, humidity or corrosive gases.

This means, that you have to plan and prepare carefully to bring your equipment to ambient temperatueres in time to avoid these thermal problems. For photographic equipment this would equally refer to the situation, when you come from climate-controlled environment (e.g. hotels) into wery hot (and humid) areas. There is an additional problem, that in bringing cold equipment into hot-humid environment, there might be condensation of humidity on the lenses/mirrors.

This problem is even more delicate with catadioptric lenses (mirror/lens-systems often called just „mirror-lenses“ – in German „Spiegel-Objektive“). In these the surface-shape of the mirrors and the adjustment from mirror to mirror is extremely sensitive for the optical performance of the lens-systems.

I have to-date not realized this with focal lengths of up to 350 mm (though it might be also there to a certain dergree) – but this is definitely an important aspect for focal lengths between 500 mm and 1,000 mm or longer.

From which focal length on these problems may occur, will mainly depend of the type of optical system  – and of course the resolution of your cameras sensor!

Here I want to show you this effect with an example of a catadioptric lens of 800 mm focal length: the Vivitar Series 1 Solid Catadioptric 800mm f/11, used on the Sony A7Rm4 (60,3 MP, 35mm format – 3.77 µm pixel-pitch).

DSCF1516_SolidCat_an_NEX

Picture 3: Vivitar Series 1 Solid Catadioptric 800mm f/11 – source: fotosaurier

It was the first day this year with just sligtly above zero outside temperature (+2 degree Celsius) and very clear air. At ca. 1:15 p.m.I set out the 800mm f/11 lens on the tripod on the balcony and tried to focus on my favorite landscape test target: a roof-top at about 40 m distance.

The advantage of this target is, that it has large AND fine details, low contrast AND high contrast areas and – most important – a sufficient depth, so that I can detect focusing errors very well!

DSC06513_A7R4_VS1-800f11_rooftop_nach3h_blog

Picture 4: Overview picture – complete field of view of the „roof-top“ landscape target in ca. 40 m distance taken with Sony A7Rm4 and Vivitar Series 1 Solid Cat 800mm f/11 – this is the „sharp“ picture after the cool-down period of the lens – source: fotosaurier

It was nearly impossible to meet the positive focus position – so I did the best guess and made the photo – and here is the 100%-crop around the focus-position, which is the first steel spring at the right side of the roof edge:

DSC06506_A7R4_VS1-800f11_rooftop-start_crop67%

Picture 5: The 67% detail of the focus-area (clamp and spiral-spring!) made 15 minutes after setting the lens outside. Best guess of focus, however, you will find no sharper point in front or behind – the distance scale on the lens says 50 meters in this non-equilibrium temperature situation – source: fotosaurier

At this point of time the lens internally is still on room temperature of about 21 degrees … starting to cool down for about 15 minutes, which it took me to set everything up and focus carefully – but desperately, becaus no really sharp focus was seen in high viewing-magnification.

I had focused using the maximum viewfinder enlagement in the Sony camera and was sure: this is not a really sharp picture. But I could not find a better focus. Picture 5 is a 67% crop of the image taken. And as the subject has some depth: no – there is no better focus to be seen on this picture in front or behind the plane of the spring.

I left the lens with camera in this position for three hours and refocused the lens: now I experienced a quite snappy focus – and you can see the same crop-area here:

DSC06513_A7R4_VS1-800f11_rooftop_nach3h_crop67%

Picture 6: The 67% detail of the focus-area (refocused!) after additional 3 hours of the lens outside – source: fotosaurier

The gain in sharpness is damatical – and it exists over the whole field of view, not only in the plane of focus! Also out-of-focus areas show higher contrast now.

However, it connot be ignored, that this catadioptric lens in this picture does by far not use the potential 3,168 Line-Pairs per Picture Height Nyquist frequency of the cameras sensor. My estimate is, that we have here an MTF30 of about 1,100-1,200 LP/PH. So either the three hours of cool-down time were not yet sufficient – or the lens may be not better than this.

(The 1,200 LP/PH MTF30-resolution would correspond to 100 Lines/mm in older „analog“ data. Very good CATs in the 1970s had center-resolutions (measured on film) between 50 and 60 Lines/mm. This relation makes sense, as the difference (factor 0.6 lower for film!) may be owed to the effect of grain and the thickness of the emulsion.)

The „Solid Cat“ 800mm f/11 is a massiv piece of optics – the lens barrel is nearly completely filled with glass, as you see in the lens-scheme:

VS1_SolidCat_800f11_pat_grau

Picture 7Lens-scheme of the Vivitar Series1 Solid Cat  – source: Perkin Elmer Patent application

It is an absolutly unusual mass of glass – so I would not exclude, that the cooling time should even be longer to reach the thermal equilibrium. My plan is, to make a sequence of photos taken in shorter intervals and over a longer time – as soon as the outside temperatures go down again.

I am not so happy with the fact, that I had to use landscape-scene-shots to demonstrate the performance of the lens, however, for 800mm focal length my IMATEST testing-arena is too short. Maybe I will make a parallel IMATEST-trial then with a 500mm CAT.

So, please, consider this as a first teaser for the topic which has shown clearly, that photographic lens performance may seriously suffer during the time, a lens is undergoing strong temperature-change and before equilibrium is reached.

I promise to come back with a more elaborate research-plan soon.

Herbert Börger

Berlin, December 4th, 2020

Aphorism of the day: Scientific research is most successfull, when it brings up more new questions than it has answered. (fotosaurier)

Copyright: fotosaurier

Fotosauriers optisches Testverfahren für Objektive mit IMATEST

Ich messe die optische Qualität von Objektiven mit Hilfe des IMATEST-Verfahrens. (Imatest ist eine 2004 in Boulder, Colorado, USA gegründete Firma.)

Das durch das Objektiv mit der Digitalkamera aufgenommene Testbild (Target) stellt eine Datei dar (Bild-Daten + Exif-Datei). Diese Datei wird mittels einer (kostenpflichtigen) IMATEST-Software analysiert (IMATEST-Studio oder IMATEST-Master). Die Analyse liefert – abhängig von der Art des Targets – eine ganze Reihe von optischen Prüfergebnissen, die letztlich alle auf der MTF-Kurve basieren.

Das Basis-Verfahren wird Imatest SFR genannt (Imatest spatial frequency response), was man allgemein als „Modulation Transfer Function“ (MTF) bezeichnet. Analysiert wird eine Hell-Dunkel-Kante, die Imatest als „clean, sharp, straight black-to-white or dark-to-light edge“. Die hellen und dunklen Flächen, die an die Hell-Dunkel-Kante angrenzen müssen sehr gleichmäßigen (konstanten) Helligkeitsverlauf besitzen. Der Analyse-Algorithmus basiert auf dem Matlab-Programm „sfrmat“. Im Prinzip ließe sich dafür jede beliebige scharfe Kante verwenden. Imatest empfiehlt und verwendet eine Kante unter 5.71° Neigung und einem Kontrast von 4:1, da dies die am besten reproduzierbaren Ergebnisse liefert:

SlantedEdge
Analysefelder an einer als „slanted-edge“ bezeichneten Hell-Dunkel-Kante, Neigung 5.71°, Kontrast 4:1     horizontal (links)- vertikal (rechts)

Es versteht sich, dass die grafische Qualität dieses Testbildes/Test-Charts eine wichtige Rolle bezüglich der Reproduzierbarkeit von damit erzielten Prüfergebnissen spielt. Deshalb habe ich mir die große Test-Chart „SFRplus 5×9“ von Imatest aus USA liefern lassen (sie kostet derzeit $430,00). Der Abstand zwischen dem oberen und unteren schwarzen Balken beträgt 783 mm – die Gesamtbreite ca. 1.600 mm:

SFRplus-Test-Chart5x9

Die SFR-Messung erfolgt hier, wie vorstehend schon beschrieben, nicht etwa an den kleinen radialen Rosetten, die in die Quadrate eingebettet sind, sondern an den horizontalen und vertikalen Kanten der um 5.71° gedrehten grauen Quadrate.

Das Testbild kommt als eingerollter Druck und muss noch auf eine perfekt ebene, stabile, dauerhafte Unterlage aufgeklebt werden. Das habe ich von einem professionellen Laminier-Betrieb auf dem stabilsten Sandwich-Trägermaterial erledigen lassen ((Blasen/Falten würden das Testbild unbrauchbar machen!). Dazu habe ich auf der Rückseite zwei Al-Profile zur Versteifung und Wandmontage aufkleben lassen. Die genau vertikale und verdrehungsfreie Wandmontag habe ich mit einem Kreuzlaser unterstützt vorgenommen.

Eine typische Aufnahme dieses Testbildes durch das zu untersuchende Objektiv mit der Digitalkamera sollte so aussehen:

Aufnahe-IMATEST-korrekt

IMATEST stellt folgende Check-Liste für die Arbeit mit der Test-Chart auf:

IMATEST - hohe Abforderungen
„Checklist“ für das reproduzierbare Arbeiten mit dem Imatest-Verfahren

Vieles ist da zu beachten – und darüberhinaus entdeckt man in der praktischen Ausführung noch eine Menge Details, die einem eine sehr hohe Konzentration abfordern… zum Beispiel die Ausleuchtung:

IMATEST-Beleuchtung

LED-Lampen! … aber bitte nicht von Akkus gespeist – da ändert sich gegen Ende der Akku-Laufzeit die Beleuchtungsstärke. Unbeding Beleuchtungsintensität messen!

Bezüglich des Arbeitsabstandes als Funktion der Pixel-Anzahl der Kamera gilt, dass die große SFRplus TestChart für die 60 MP der Sony A7Rm4, die ich einsetze, gerade ausreichend ist.

Es kann im Prinzip jeder machen, der eine hohe Motivation dazu hat – aber es ist von äußerst großem Nutzen, wenn man viel von Optik und Physik versteht … damit man am Ende nicht Hausnummern misst! 😉

Ich werde jetzt nicht mehr in jedes Detail gehen. Natürlich ist die nächste wirklich wichtige Hürde, die man nehmen muss, die Ausrichtung der Kamera/Objektiv-Achse zur Mitte und zur Ebene des Testbildes. (Ich arbeite da mit zwei Kreuz-Lasern.)

Wenn man schließlich alles im Griff hat und man hat korrekte Aufnahme-Dateien des Testbildes erstellt, dann ist der Rest mit der Imatest-Software tatsächlich eine Knopfdruck-Aktion: mit dem oben dargestellten Chart SFRplus definiert das Programm automatisch 46 „ROI“ (region of interest) – also kleine Ausschnitte der „slanted-edges“ wie oben beschrieben – mal horizontal mal vertikal orientiert – und analysiert dann binnen weniger Sekunden die Auflösung an diesen 46 Stellen, die MTF-Kurve, ein (vorher festgelegtes) Kantenprofil und die Auflösungskurve über dem Bildkreisradius (getrennt nach sagittaler und meridionaler Orientierung.

Kantenprofil+MTF-Kurve
Beispiel einer Kantenprofil/MTF-Auswertung an einer einzelnen ROI-Position (14% rechts vom Bildzentrum)

Das wird in Graphen oder auch in Tabellenform ausgelesen – bzw. als Datei, mit der man weitere programmierte Auswertungen und Darstellungen durchführen könnte.

Angén24f3,5_Offen_sagittal

MTF30-Auflösungswerte in Linienpaaren je Bildhöhe (60 MP-Sensor!) in den ROI-Positionen mit überwiegend sagittaler Orientierung. Man erkennt, dass die Methode bis sehr weit in die äußerenen Bildecken hinein funktioniert!

Auflösungs-Daten kann man für mehrere MTF-Kontrast-Werte (MTF10, MTF20, MTF30, MTF50) ausgeben lassen. Dann wird neben den Einzelwerten in der obigen grafischen Darstllung auch der gewichtete Mittelwert der (z.B.) MTF30-Auflösung über das GESAMTE Bildfeld, der Mittelwert für die MITTE, der Mittelwert für den Übergangsbereich und der Mitttelwert für die Ecken ausgegeben:

MTF30-Mittelwerte
Gesamt- (gewichtet!) und Zonen-Mittelwerte aus den Einzelwerten der darüber dargestellten Messung – die Mittelwerte enthalten ALLE sagittalen und meridionalen Meßergebnisse.

Außer den Auflösungs- und MTF-Daten werden Chromatische Aberration und Verzeichnung ermittelt.

Ich messe stets bei ALLEN Blenden jedes Objektives und definiere als „optimale Blende“ der jeweiligen Optik die mit dem höchsten (gewichteten) Gesamt-Mittelwert der Auflösung über das gesamte Bildfeld. Es kann dabei sein, dass an diesem Blendenwert die maximale Auflösung in der Bildmitte schon überschritten ist, aber die Rand/Ecken-Auflösung noch deutlich steigt.

Zur Charakterisierung einer Optik habe ich mich entschieden, folgende Auflösungswerte anzugeben – und zwar einmal bei Offenblende, einmal bei optimaler Blende:

  • Mittelwert gesamte Bildfläche (gewichtet mit 1/0.75/0.25)
  • Mittelwert der Meßpunkte in Bildmitte (bis 30% Bildradius)
  • Mittelwert der Meßpunkte Rand/Ecken (außerhalb 70& Bildradius)
  • MTF-Kurve (über der Frequenz aufgetragen)
  • Kurve der Auflösung über dem Bildradius (Mitte=0 …. Ecke=100)

Außerdem Verzeichnung und CA. In meinen Vergleichstabellen kann das dann so aussehen:

Tabellen-Beispiel Auflösung

Gelegentlich kann die 3D-Darstellung der Auflösung über der Bildfläche noch zu weiteren Erkenntnissen beitragen. Hier ein Beispiel (dasselbe Objektiv, wie in den anderen Beispielen weiter oben und unten!):

Angén90f11_Merid+Sagit_3D

3D-Darstellung der meridionalen (links) und sagittalen (rechts) MTF50-Auflösungswerte 

Alle Messungen erfolgen an derselben Digitalkamera Sony A7Rm4 mit 60 MP-Sensor und E-Mount-Objektivanschluß unter stets gleicher Einstellung von Auflösung und kamerainterem RAW-Converter (z.B. Schärfung auf Wert „0“).

Soviel zur konkreten Messung der Qualität der optischen Systeme. Und damit wäre für fabrikneue Objektive an einer Kamera, für die die Optik hergestellt wurd, eigentlich alles gesagt.

Bei meinen Untersuchungen an HISTORISCHEN Objektiven treten allerdings folgende Einflüsse auf:

a) Ich nehme hier die Messungen an historischen Objektiven vor, die bis zu 100 Jahre alt sein können. Die meisten davon sind in einem normalen Abnutzungs- und Alterungs-Zustand, wobei ich festhalten möchte, dass nur Objektive in ein Vergleichsprogramm aufgenommen werden, die keine starken Ablagerungen, Beläge und Separationen an Linsenflächen zeigen, die schon als „Schleier“ in Erscheinung treten. Staubpartikel im Inneren und mäßige Putzspuren sind nicht auszuschließen – aber alle geprüften Optiken erscheinen – auch mit einer LED-Punktlampe durchleuchtet – weitgehend klar! Welchen Einfluss die Alterung und „normale“ Verschmutzung auf die Messergebnisse haben kann ich nicht klären – ich schlage vor, dass man die Ergebnisse pragmatisch eben als das ansieht, was sie sind: nämlich die Eigenschaften (unterschiedlich) gealterter historischer optischer Geräte! Die Ergebnisse liefern allenfalls einen orientierenden Eindruck vom Auslegungs- und Neu-Zustand dieser Objektive. Da die Ergebnisse in vielen Fällen überraschend gut ausfallen, darf man die Dinge auch gerne so bestaunen, wie sie jetzt erscheinen. Ich kann mir kaum vorstellen, dass die Optiken durch die Alterung BESSER geworden sind…

b) Um die Objektive der unterschiedlichsten historischen Kamerasysteme (wie Exakta, Alpa, M42,…) an die Kamera mit E-Mount anzuschließen, wird ein ADAPTER benötigt. Damit tritt ein rein mechanisch-geometrisches Problem im Versuchsaufbau auf: nach meinen bisherigen Erfahrungen ist genau das die zweitgrößte Fehlerquelle bei den Versuchen, über die ich berichte. Weil der Adapter nun ein Bestandteil der Fassung des Objektives ist, verschlechtern sich oft Zentrierung und Ausrichtung der optischen Achse relativ zum digitalen Bildsensor.

Die IMATEST-Software liefert bezüglich dieses Problemes allerdings eine wichtige Hilfestellung:

Angén90f2,5_f11_Geometry

Analyse der Geometrie der Imatest-Bilddatei: in der untersten Zeile stehen die „Convergence angles“ in horizontaler und Vertikaler Richtung: wenn die Zahlenwerte hier „Null“ sind, ist die Ebene des Testbildes relativ zur Sensor-Ebene ideal parallel ausgerichtet (d.h. die Linien des Rasters schneiden sich im „Unendlichen“. Die Bildmitten müssen sich dann nicht exakt decken (s. dritte Zeile von unten: central square pixel shift).

Man kann dieses Analyse-Ergebnis benutzen, um den Meßaufbau mit dem jeweiligen Adapter  optimal auszurichten. Ich habe mir derzeit eine Toleranz von <0.1 Grad bei den Konvergenz-Winkeln gesetzt.

c) Die größte  – und leider nicht sicher abzuklärende – Fehlerquelle bei diesen Messungen an historischen Objektiven, die für die Benutzung mit „Analog-Film“ konstruiert wurden, ist die unbekannte Wechselwirkung zwischen Optik und Digital-Sensor („Digital-Tauglichkeit“).

Hier sehe ich aufgrund meiner Erfahrungen drei Haupt-Probleme:

c1) Mögliche Reflexionen zwischen einer oder mehreren Linsenflächen und der Sensoroberfläche. Das kann sich zonenweise als Kontrastminderung auswirken oder auch das Bild ganz gravierend stören. In meinem Blog-Beitrag über das Ernostar 100mm f2.0 habe ich eine solche Erscheinung beschrieben (mit dem 42 MP Sony-Sensor).

Ernostar (die 2.) – Streulicht-Problem auf Anolog-Film?

Dort bildete sich beim Abblenden über f5.6 ein großer, milchig aufgehellter Bereich in der Bildmitte. Am 24 MP-APSC-Sensor in der Fujifilm-X-T2 (bzw. X-Pro2) trat dieselbe Erscheinung nicht auf. Dabei habe ich auch untersucht, dass diese Erscheinung auf Analog-Film bei diesem Ernostar-Objektiv nicht auftrat.

c2) Anti-Aliasing-Filter als zusätzliche optische Elemente können einen nennenswerten Einfluß auf die Bildqualität nehmen. Das ist sehr anschaulich im Artikel von H.H.Nasse unter lenspire.zeiss.com beschrieben.

https://lenspire.zeiss.com/photo/app/uploads/2018/11/Nasse_Objektivnamen_Distagon.pdf

Allerdings besitzt die verwendete Sony A7Rm4 kein Anti-Aliasing Filter, sodass ich nicht davon ausgehe, dass es in meinen Untersuchungen diesen Einfluss gibt.

c3) Hintere Schnittweite (Abstand zwischen hinterstem Linsenscheitel und der Film/Sensor-Ebene) und daraus möglicherweise resultierende sehr flache Einfalls-Winkel der Strahlen auf den Sensor. Was der Film verkraftet (und zwangsweise mit starkem Helligkeitsabfall im Außenbereich des Bildes quittiert = starke Vignettierung) bekommt dem Sensor nicht: es kommt zu schlimmsten Einbrüchen der Auflösung und Farbübertragung! Auch das ist im Nasse-Artikel sehr anschaulich beschrieben!

Diese Erscheinung gilt grundsätzlich für alle (symmetrischen) Weitwinkelobjektive der Brennweite <35mm an Digitalsensoren, also meistens für die Weitwinkelobjektive mit Bildwinkel >70°, die für analoge Meßsucherkameras gebaut wurden. Für Retrofokus-Objektive gilt das nicht.

Ich rechne aber damit, dass es auch noch andere, unbekannte Wechselwirkungen zwischen Analog-Objektiv-Strahlengang und Digitalsensor gibt. Deshalb ist für mich die wichtigste Voraussetzung für die VERGLEICHBARKEIT von Messergebnissen mittels Digitalkamera, dass immer dieselbe Kamera dafür verwendet wird – mit immer gleichen Einstellungen des RAW-Converters.

Copyright Fotosaurier, Herbert Börger, Berlin, 07. März 2020